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Home » Sailnet Boat Reviews » L - Boats starting with 'L' » Lancer
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Lancer 25
Reviews Views Date of last review
4 4816 Tue March 14, 2006
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers None indicated 7.0












Description: Lancer 25
Keywords: Lancer 25
 


Author
administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Wed August 6, 1997 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:


I did a lot of changes like adding a 3 foot bow sprint and additional balist. Thus the boat is faster and heads up wind better. Added a running backstay allowing me to angle the mast back in heavy winds. Also I am changing the interior considerably. I have also painted the deck and hull. By adding the bow sprint I can add an innerforstay making the boat a cutter instead of a sloop. I have also added additional schrouds to handle the additional load of the two head sails.


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administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Sat December 4, 1999 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

WELL THOUGHT OUT DESIGN. EASILY SINGLE-HANDED. SEPARATE HEAD AND FORE AND AFT SINKS A PLUS. SPACIOUS CABIN. FAIRLY LIGHT WEIGHT MEANS IT MOVES ALONG NICELY UNDER POWER. CAN LIVE ABOAED FOR A WEEK OR SO WITH NO PROBLEM.SHALLOW DRAFT (THREE FEET) IS HANDY IN RIVERS. OVERALL, A GREAT LITTLE FAMILY CRUISER.
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Review Date: Thu January 24, 2002 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

The Lancer 25 is a rock-solid boat. The fiberglass is about twice the thinkness of current model boats, and the 3/4 boat length poured-in-place keel creates a solid feel to its action in rough seas.

I sail in bays and coastally, and the Lancer has a easy, but powerful sailplan that allows the crew to make adjustments depending on conditions.

Inside, there is more than 6' of standing room! And the cocpit has a separate engine compartment and plenty of room for 4 people to fit comfortably - a truly good use of space for a 25'.

Easy to maintain, all through-fittings are bronze and the deck hardware is minimal. I would like to add a roller-furler to the boat, but since the Lancer is so easy to handle, I am not too motivated to spend the money to do this.

All in all, this boat is great for a cruising family who would like a sturdy daysailer or a weekend overnight.
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64dartgt
Junior Member

Registered: December 2003
Posts: 7
Review Date: Tue March 14, 2006 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 7 

 
Pros: Inexpensive trailerable with big boat features & feel
Cons: relatively poor winward performance and sluggish in light winds

The (Shad Turner designed) Lancer 25's greatest asset is that they are often available at a price similar to a Hunter 23 or Catalina 22. For that money you often don't get a trailer. You are really paying for the age/condition of the sails and the outboard. A new set of sails is only ~$1100 and a new outboard is $2-3000. The boat was designed with a post mounted rudder and 3/4 length wide 3 foot draft shoal keel to enable it to be trailerable. This keel design results in a number of compromises including somewhat poor winward performance and sluggish response in light air, probably due to the approximately three foot wide keel. Mine is fractionally rigged (mast is 10 feet from the bow) with a 32 foot deck stepped mast with a large main sail and a small roller furling jib. This rig is lauded by designers as being very simple for the beginner as it is easy to manage. Use of the jib is really a requirement, not an option in my experience as tacking under the main alone can prove challenging. 1200 lbs of ballast encapsulated in the solid keel, although at a realatively shallow depth, makes the boat feel quite stable and big in comparison to a smaller boat. Inside there is a depression, or trench, in the floor, which provides ~6 feet of standing headroom in the companionway (you are actually walking "in" the keel) which makes pictures of the interior deceiving as in the head forward (no vee birth) "head room" is only about four feet making head use quite a docking manuever. The boat is nicely appointed with carpeting, a teak and holly sole in the "trench" and wooden bulkheads and a wooden cupboard on each side of the boat near the companionway aft. One houses a sink and the other a two burner alcohol stove. There are two quarter berths aft suitable for small childen. The port settee pulls out to form a double berth. At 6 feet I just fit in if I sleep on the outside of the berth. On the starboard side is a dinette with limited headroom forward that converts into another settee or berth that is shorter than the other berth by about a foot. On deck my boat has an anchor locker, bow and stern rails with double lifelines and three winches, two aft and one on the mast. The Lancer 25 was built from the mid 70's to early 80's (74-83?). Earlier versions have large greenhouse windows, which tend to leak potentially causing greater deck damage than later models with small opening ports. They also may not be fractionally rigged, requiring a compression post at the front of the "trench." The mast step is another potential source of deak leaks and the full headliner makes access difficult. Hull and deck construction quality is good, perhaps with the exception of the hull to deck joint which is not through bolted, but consists of an overlapped bonded joint with screws passing through the top and side of the toe rail into interior wood backing. Inexpensive boats tend to be fixer-uppers, but I couldn't have bought a better boat the same size for three times what I paid for mine. She has served us well as a large daysailer in bays/protected waters with plenty of room for four in the cockpit and we have stayed overnight comfortably a few times. If I hadn't found her we probably wouldn't be on the water now.
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