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Home » Sailnet Boat Reviews » M - Boats starting with 'M' » Mariner
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Mariner 36
Reviews Views Date of last review
4 3311 Fri October 11, 2002
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers None indicated None indicated












Description: Mariner 36
Keywords: Mariner 36
 


Author
administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Sat January 25, 1997 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Made in New Hampshire. Somewhat heavy but comfortable and safe. Very well made.
Looking for other Mariner 36 owners to sail Marion/Bermuda
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administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Sun September 21, 1997 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Very solid boat, that sails and motors well. Initial problems with sails and propeller can be overcome. It sails much better than its PHRF rating.
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deapthx7
Junior Member

Registered: February 2002
Review Date: Fri October 11, 2002 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Have sailed the boat on the Great lakes one year so far. Wonderfull boat, over built but a classic. 50 hp Perkins makes it good under power and the boat is not sluggish under sail. You cannot go wrong.
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MHRitter

Member

Registered: February 2001
Location: Northeast Wisconsin
Posts: 30
Review Date: Mon January 6, 2003 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

We love this boat, it is built very well and still sails responsively. see www.sankaty.homestead.com

The hull is hand-laid 22-ounce woven roving combined with 1 1/2-ounce mat saturated with polyester resin. These layers are alternately laid down and patterned to yield excellent strength in all directions. There are more layers near the keel. The 5,650-lb foil shaped lead keel is bolted to the hull with 11 schedule 316 stainless, 3/4-inch diameter bolts. The seal between the keel and hull is achieved with gray butyl around all eleven-keel bolts. An aluminum-welded box is attached to two of the keel bolts and used as the step for the mast.
The deck is a non-skid glare reducing one piece molded fiberglass with resin impregnated end-grain balsa core combining strength with minimum weight. All deck gear and winch island pads are reinforced with resin saturated 1/2 inch mahogany plywood bonded into the deck mold. Winches, cleats and areas of stress due to equipment placement are backed with 1/4-inch aluminum plates. Gear is installed on the deck with a bed of butyl rubber gasket and the bolts are wrapped with gray butyl tape throughout.
The hull to deck joint is sealed with a Butyl rubber gasket and bolted with stainless 1/4 x 20 bolts on 4-inch centers. Every other bolt also secures the toe rail. Self-locking aircraft nuts are used throughout. Laminated pads are located underneath the Lifeline stanchions. These pads are bedded into the underside of the deck and then backed up with 1/4" aluminum pads. The pedestals are gasketed to the deck and sealed off at the bolts. There are ten Bowmar openings in the cabin top. The two large hatches on top of the deck have tinted lexan.
The rudder is cast in a split mold. It has a solid core with a molded fiberglass outer surface and a solid 2-inch stainless steel shaft with stainless steel support webs welded to the shaft. The top of the rudder shaft goes into a Delrin tube with a bronze stuffing box. The top bearing is mounted to a two-inch thick fiberglass encapsulated wood hanger. The Delrin tube is heavily laminated to the hull and extremely sturdy. Above the top bearing is the wheel for the cable. The wheel has a bolted on pipe section that is used as the mechanical stop to prevent turning the rudder up against the skeg. The stops are glass encapsulated wood blocks that are laminated to the bottom side of the cockpit floor.



see www.sankaty.homestead.com for our 10 month live abaord experience

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