Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






 Not a Member? 



Home » Sailnet Boat Reviews » N - Boats starting with 'N' » Newport
more

Previous Product    Next Product
Newport 33
Reviews Views Date of last review
3 7315 Wed July 10, 2002
spacer
Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers None indicated None indicated












Description: Newport 33
Keywords: Newport 33
 


Author
administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Sun February 9, 1997 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Production 33 foot sailboat of Gary Mull design. Essentially a reworked Ranger 33 with more beam, among other things. Boat is boarderline Coastal Cruising and Blue Water-capable. Key weaknesses are the rudder and rudder shaft. The Liner used inhibits major modifications. Bulkheads should be glasses to hull, and foreward shrouds should be connected to either a bulkhead or to the hull. Other deficiencies basically derived from it's production manufacturing cost requirements. It's a great sailboat that sets well on the ocean swell, and can go to weather with the best of them.
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user  
administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Thu June 25, 1998 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

10'10" beam, 32'11" overall, 27' waterline. Sloop rigged, aft cockpit, 5'2" fin, exposed spade rudder. I just purchased it so I can only relay my observations made while she was moored, along with comments from my surveyor. These vessels have a historically weak hull/keel joint which is easily damaged in groundings. They also suffer from an exposed and (in my opinion) feeble rudder. The engine is a 3cyl Universal, fresh h2o cooling rated at 25hp. It runs smoothly, has plenty of power and is not overly obtrusive. The interior is very nicely finished. Mine has the enclosed quarterberth which I believe is a boneheaded design. It makes the 1/4 claustrophobic and eliminates the potential for a useable nav station. I am an electrician by trade an I love the panel. It permits excellent access is functional and attractive too. I am going to install a weather cover over it though as it is adjacent to the companionway. My boat has seen little use so the cushions are in terrific condition as well as all the other canvas. The stanchions are flexible at their bases to alleviate gel coat crazing.

Now the down side. Hull is cored so we have the usual concerns there. Port chainplate appears to be allowing h2o ingress (no rain here for 60 days so I don't know extent yet). Main salon hatch is a joke! Acrylic with wimpy latches and (I'm still having a difficult time believing this) GLUED on hinges! Additionally it opens all of three inches before it hits the vang rigging - not much use in an emergency. Other hatches are lewmars and are solid. The main salon portlights do not open and will probably be replaced with something more substantial when I have time. Forward shrouds are decked fastened - probably no big deal for light use. If converting to offshore use I would leave these and add additionals. Bulkheads are "floating". Need to reanchor with substantial thru bolts or go ahead and glass them. I'm going to mount a Monitor on the transom and as such will probably have to lose the swim ladder, which is just fine, it looks lousy.
I'm really excited. Despite being ranked as a cut above the Hunters (not very flattering!) I see alot of potential here. Extra stringers and glass will not only take a bite out of your wallet if done "professionally" (about 5k) but the extra glass will nicely complement the light displacement of only 9klb. As mentioned previously, a skeg is a must if this boat is to be taken far from land - that rudder is tooooo vul;nerable (another reason for the Monitor - emergency rudder ability). Will post more after six months at sea. E-mail w/questions. Cheers, Mike
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user  
majoun
Junior Member

Registered: March 2001
Posts: 10
Review Date: Wed July 10, 2002 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

The Newport 33 is a Gary Mull design built by the now defunct Capital Yachts of Harbor City, CA. As were so many boats emerging from that era, it was marketed as a Racer/Cruiser and was clearly designed for coastal and bay sailing. The hull was constructed of fibreglass layers without coring. Decks and coachroofs were generally of end grain balsa, although solid teak has been found in some areas and marine ply was used as necessary for vertical strength. The 1986 model has it's deck hardware set in solid fiberglass laminate without coring, whereas items mounted on the coachroof such as clutches, winches, etc. penetrate a coring which must be monitored for water damage. I am in the process of removing every item, sealing to prevent water egress, and repairing where necessary. Handrails appear to be a major source of water leaks on all Newports. My cockpit sole had delaminated when I acquired her, and substantial time and money is being spent in repair. this is a fairly common matter for Capital built boats which included Gulfs and Neptunes as well as Newports. Overall construction and fiberglassing appears consistent with other manufacturers.
Newports were generally sold with 150 genoas and 110 lappers, although sail selection was left to the buyer and numerous sizes were offerred. McKibbon (?) built most of the Newport sails in the 1980's. The builder liked to used CDI continuous line furlers and while bulletproof, they are now dated.
The boat is relatively fast even in the hands of a novice. She sails well while flying only the 150 - sans main. The 150 was a deck sweeper.
Most boats were sold with pump and pressure water, decent sized heads, and galleys with alcohol fed stoves. The 33 was offerred in the standard layout, and a tri cabin configuration which I have really enjoyed as the rear cabin has a decent nav station. Spars were either the usual aluminum seen frequently in those years or the optional black Isomat spars with internal lines.
She was reported to displace 9500 lbs. My boat has the 5'2" draft although she was offerred in 6' and 4' draft models. Beam is 10'10". Capital claimed the keels are of lead and alloy. The cockpit is quite large which my wife likes. It is good for entertaining. Interior is heavy with teal which I like. The thru hulls for the head use plastic gate valves which should be replaced with bronze or Marelon (my choice).
The engine is by Universal (Kubota) and is a strong workhorse seemingly to run forever. Mine is the M25 model with 21 horsepower. Later Newport 33's came with M25XP's with 23 hp.
This is my second Newport. They are terribly underpriced for what you get. My suggestion is to buy one that has been kept up to date with furling, winches, heads, etc as your best buy is definitely with those models. This is a family boat that sails easily and comfortably and is a great buy. I'd do it again.
Fair winds
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user  


Powered by: Reviewpost vB3 Enhanced
Copyright 2010 All Enthusiast, Inc.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:20 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.