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Home » Sailnet Boat Reviews » N - Boats starting with 'N' » Newport
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Newport 30 MK I
Reviews Views Date of last review
3 2977 Mon December 2, 2002
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers None indicated None indicated












Description: Newport 30 MK I
Keywords: Newport 30 MK I
 


Author
administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Fri December 13, 1996 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:


I own the 1970 Gary Mull Newport 30 Mk I "...in a meeting." The Mull design is the Mark I and Mark II. Headroom is only 5' 9" and this makes for a low freeboard, low windage profile. The Mark III is somewhat bulkier and is equipped with a wheel, diesel and full 6' 3" headroom. The Mark I an II are considered Racer/Cruisers since they are stiff, medium displacement, fin-keel sloops and there are a great number to race in one-design classes. All come with tillers and spade rudders which makes them spritely around the buoys.

Cruising amenities include a head, galley and it will sleep 7. I have installed a wheel on "...in a meeting" and should anyone want to know how its done and what to expect they can contact me. The wheel is a 32" stainless steel destroyer type on a deluxe pedastal from Edson. They can provide plans for the retrofit. It provides a good deal more space in the cockpit for cruising and there seems to be no loss of response at the helm or manueverability for racing.

The Atomic 4 is the standard power plant but many diesel upgrades have been done, most at a cost almost equaling the cost of the boat itself. Access to the engine and fuel tank are as miserable as in any sailboa, however, and changing oil is a messy and time-consuming endeavor.

Early fiberglass boats (pre-1974) have far fewer problems with osmotic blitering than boats that were built in the days of mass-produced pleasure boats, and the 1970 Newport is a case in point, at least mine is. Hull integrity is good, but all boats leak and the Newport 30 is no exception. The deck seam, chain plate and toe rails are areas of special concern

Folding props, spinnakers, roller furling and other "go fast" and convenience toys make the boat a great deal of fun for day-sailing or coastal cruising, though some have done ocean crossings such as the Transpac. I have spent $15,000 dollars to buy and equip one of the most fun boats on San Francisco Bay. A lot of boat for the money, I am using her to hone my sailing skills in one of the worlds unique and challenging sailing environments. I will then trade her in for a bluewater cruising yacht that will take my wife and I around the world having learned all that I can from this wonderful, little starter boat.


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administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Fri September 4, 1998 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:



I have owned this fine old boat for over 4 years. I am not sure that it really is the MK I version, the original sales literature simply says "Newport 30". This boat has proven itself to be quite adequate for S. California costal crusing . It was built in 1967 by Capital Yachts in Costa Mesa, CA and the registration states it is #43!

The fin keel, canoe hull is very easily driven and will leave most other 30 footers behind when sailing just off the wind, in fact I have kept up with 36 to 40 footers for hours in 15 to 25 knot conditions.

Of course like all these canoe hulls the thing is kinda of wicked at anchor - a set of rocker stoppers has helped a LOT. I am going to probably get a riding sail made to help keep the pointed end going into the end.

My boat has benifited from a knowledgable previous owner who engaged in some pretty heroic projects: hull stiffening by glassing in numerous stringers and bulkheads, additional water tanks to 60 gallons, new sta-lock rigging, propane stove, new atomic 4 engine and fuel tank, and wind vane.

I have added a very reliable loran, wheel steering (edison) dodger, roller furling, - in short the boat is extremely comfortable, pleasant and affordable.

I am not sure the boat is really all that un-competitve either: a couple of years ago I raced in the local wednesday night races here in Redondo Beach and while I was definitely in last place for the first few races, at the end of the season we were within seconds of the first place boats. Also I must point out that a Newport 30 won the overall first place trophy for the 1998 West Marine Pacific Cup (San Fransisco to Hawaii) race - beating the usual and famous mega yacts such as Roy Disney's Pyewacket.

I know my boat has spent time cruising in Mexico, and there is no end to what you can probably do with these fine, old, small yachts - just be dilligent about upgrades and maintenance.

I would not recommend a thirty year old sailboat to anyone who is not interested in doing a lot of maintenance and upgrades - I am a former construction firm owner (& carpenter), current architect and have built one boat previously to owning this one.

After reading the other owner's reviews on this boat I think they all have pointed out good things to know-spade rudder is definitely exposed, the boat could point better, it's best point of sail is off the wind.

My old boat shows no signs of blistering (knock on wood), can easily handle 25 knot breeze and 6' swell - This winter I moved the boat from King Harbor to LA - between el nino storms - we had 11' swells and 15 to 20 knots of wind - the boat handled these conditions in a fairly routine manner - of course we eased off on the wind and seas, and never really felt we were exceeding the boats abilities.

Any way, the bottom line is this: it's a great old boat, but like any old boat - you gotta do the work, ... but then you get to go sailing!


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Review Date: Mon December 2, 2002 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Newport 30. FWC Atomic four, New Main 2000, all new covers 2002, pressure water system, LoranC, auto/manual bilge pump, all lines led aft, all lines replaced except main halyard, ice box, alcohol stove/oven, no blisters on last haul out, bottom done 2001, new s/s shaft 1999, new 27g fuel tank 1998, 40g fresh water, black water tank, macerator pump, "y" valve, heavy amp alternator, 1" stainless dodger frame. Engine runs well.Other extras. Good sailing boat!
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