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Home » Sailnet Boat Reviews » O - Boats starting with 'O' » O'Day
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O'Day 302
Reviews Views Date of last review
4 2088 Sat December 14, 2002
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers None indicated None indicated












Description: O'Day 302
Keywords: O'Day 302
 


Author
administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Wed December 30, 1998 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:


A great crusing boat. Small aft cabin is key feature for
cruising with guests. Has 140 genoa and is very under powered in air under 14 mph. Swim platform is nice feature.
Cabin seating is slighting uncomfortable, as settee is too narrow for lounging. Have added cutting board over stove and installed microwave instead of oven. This adds work space and the microwave comes in very handy.


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administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Tue July 11, 2000 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

I just had one surveyed 7/11/00. It flunked badly. the chainplates pull on steel rods that pull on the floor pan... the floor pan deflects the hull (since it is poorly reinforced if any at all) and there are cracks 6 feet long horizontally about 18 inches above the water line...

and this boat "looked" almost new elsewhere... it had not been sailed hard at all
bad design/build
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gvanbell
Junior Member

Registered: November 2002
Review Date: Sat December 14, 2002 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

The O’Day 302 was the eighteenth hull design by C. Raymond Hunt and Associates for O’Day. They began working together with the O’Day 23 in 1970 and continued working together through the 322, 302, and 272, all of which sported a similar topside look and interior arrangement and the wing keel.

The O’Day 302 owner’s manual states that the 322, 302, and 272 “ differ markedly from their earlier sisters…in several areas: exterior aesthetics, keel design, accommodation format, and interior detailing.”

The interior arrangement is modern, with the head aft to starboard and a double berth aft to port.

Of note for performance reasons here is wing keel. The keel draws 3’11” , making this a great shallow water boat. O’Day notes that a drawback of this design is the need for the boat to heel to 10 degrees in light winds to realize the full effect of the keel design. In simple terms, the keel generates a downward force, pulling the boat into the water as the hull speed increases. We have noticed that the boat handles well under power and in tight conditions, and attribute some of this to the shallow draft and light displacement. Owners of both the 302 and 322 call attention to the keel bolts in their boats. It is apparently not uncommon for the bolts to come loose, though this hasn't manifested itself in our sloop. Some owners have spent a great deal of money reinforcing the bilge area and attachment points for the keel to disperse the load generated by the keel. I have spoken with as many who have never had a problem with the keel. Our particular boat showed no signs of a loose keel joint, but I consider it part of the maintenance to check the bolts regularly.

The 302 weighs in at only 7200 pounds (2400 pounds ballast), which is dangerously light with a standard fin keel, but with the wing keel the righting moment is figured in a non-conventional way.

The light weight of the boat caused us some initial concern for us, but the 302 is built well. By 1988 most glass boats were getting lighter, especially those expressly designed for coastal cruising and daysailing. The light-air performance is the emphasis here, and it shines in this area. In anything under 15 knots this is a very fast, responsive boat. The waterline could be a touch longer for the overall length, but I don't get the sense that we lose much speed because of it.

The 302 is designed to be easily sailed shorthanded. There are two reef points, on single lines run to the cockpit. The mainsheet, jib sheets, and furler line are all run to the cockpit as well. When things are rigged well and set properly, she can be sailed almost entirely from the cockpit under the cover of the dodger.

The foresail is a 140% genoa, which is plenty of sail in most conditions. It can be sailed down to about 100% without sacrificing much efficiency. Trying to reef the jib this way works, but it doesn’t handle well. A storm jib is a better option. I have spoken with a 302 owner who runs twin headsails on a single furler to maximize his sail options.

The gelcoat on the 302 isn't great, and it is subject to crazing and cracking.

I have read reviews in which people claim the chainplate design is faulty, but this does not manifest itself so in our boat.

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tcfceo
Junior Member

Registered: January 2003
Posts: 5
Review Date: Sun January 5, 2003 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

I have owned the 302 since 1997, and find it to be a very reliable, well built vessel. Inside, the cabin is laid out comfortably (head aft) and gives the illusion of it being a larger boat. Most people will opt to use the V-berth as opposed to the aft cabin as the master. The air circulation in the aft cabin isn't enough to keep you cool on warm nights, while the hatch over the v-berth is.

Problems I've had are: 1) Hatch in V-berth leaks. 2) Gel coat is easily spidered, nicked, and cracked. 3) The head has always had issues. It pumps out well, but has difficulty bringing in fresh water.

This boat is sailed for 2 day weekends a minimum of 10 times a year, and has yet to have any equipment malfunction. The Yanmar engine starts first crank out of winter storage, and the rigging and sails have behaved perfectly.

Addressing the cracks mentioned in a different review... I have the same cracks. They come not from the hull's design, but from ham-handed docking. When I purchased the 302, it was crack free. After a rough docking in Maine, I now have similar cracks to what was described in the other review. They are 18" or so above the waterline because that's about where the dock sits. To prove the cracks came from the dock, they are only on the starboard side of my boat, which is the side I unfortunately rammed into a craggly dock in Maine under some severe conditions.

Being the 3rd boat I have owned, this is definitely my favorite, and has provided me with years of hassle free sailing. It's also great because you can take inexperienced crew out and single hand it if necessary. In fact, I single handed this vessel from Maine to NYC without any difficulty.

Hope this review helps.
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