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Home » Sailnet Boat Reviews » S - Boats starting with 'S' » Seaward

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Seaward 17 (Fox)
Reviews Views Date of last review
6 6152 Tue October 27, 2009
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers None indicated 10.0












Description: Seaward 17 (Fox)
Keywords: Seaward 17 (Fox)
 


Author
administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Sun September 15, 1996 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Pocket cruiser, slop rigged, center board. Four berths in 17 feet with wide 8 foot beam. Doesn't point well but is good sailer even in 15-20 kts.
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administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Thu March 20, 1997 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Strong & Stable. Sails well under Main & Jib, or Main alone.
Does not point as well as a full keel or centerboard boat
but does pretty good for a shoal draft. Appears to be well
built and holding up under the Florida Sun. Have been sailing
single handled on Lake Harris in Central Florida.
Bought this boat used this year and am very happy with it
thus far. Previous boats and sailing experience include
Star, Rhodes 19, O'Day 23 Pop Top, Venture 23.
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administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Wed June 9, 1999 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:


Just purchased this year. Very seaworthy looking. 8 ft. beam, 1350 lbs,450 lb ballast, 19" draft,fully battened main, self tending jib with one batten. The boat has upper and lower shrouds supporting the mast. My upper shrouds could not be tightened enough and needed to have turnbuckles installed. The lowers were not long enough so I added toggles(extensions) to them. The sail had plastic guides installed directly on either side of each batten. This created side pressure and made the sail impossible to raise. I was told to use canning wax which helped lubricate the track but helped little. A local sailmaker told me that the slugs should be at least 4" away from any batton. He cut off the slugs below each batton. This did the trick! 5 mast stepping and $110 latter I'm ready to sail. SAILING: This is the good part. This boat is very stable and heels very little. Even in 10-15 knot winds she is very light at the helm and completely under control. She is surprisingly quick and points better than expected for a wide shallow draft boat. I suspect that part of the reason that she heels so little is that she is giving up a lot of leeway. Meaning that she doesn't point all that well. But much better than the Com-Pac 16 I had. C 16 also heels a lot. The Fox is a very good sailing boat, and much less tender than an O'Day 240 I owned. This boat seems very well made. Lots of bronze and solid glass. This is my 4th boat and I am much more satisfied with it than my others:Oday 23, Oday 240, oday javelin. Other boats to consider are Cape Dory Typhoon, and skipper 19. Both are heavier and probably handle heavy weather a little better.(althought the Fox is excellent in this respect.) Both may track a little better. But neither can perform in light air like the Fox. I would recommend buying a used Fox making appropriate rigging changes, and enjoying. I have a 3.5 Tohositu motor which takes boat to hull speed at 14 power. New Fox is cat rigged with carbon fiber unstayed mast. I wonder how ti compares to sloop?


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administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Mon June 14, 1999 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

I purchased "Destiny" in Jan 1999 (1st owner)On her Maiden voyage I found several things that needed to be changed.
1. Upper shrouds could not be adjusted(very loose)
2. No mast compression post, rather (2) 1 1/4' wood braces on either side of the V-berth making it usless. (had to re-design)Note: (the Carbon fiber mast is worst, it goes in the middle of the V-berth).
3. Jib, very poor performance in light air.
4. Life lines design poorly. (re-designed)
Additions:
1. (2) winchs, T-tracks, and cars
2. (1) 150 Genoa
3. Re-design the cabin support for the mast.This really openned up the cabin, and got rid of the wood braces.
4. Ran all lines to the cockpit

In winds up to 12 knots 150% Genny does wonders, 13 to 18 the org. jib (storm jib as I call it) does OK. 5 to 8 knots of wind Forget runing with Main only in less the motor is running your not going anywhere, and you'll never come about.

With the correct sails up the boat handles very well and the cockpit is comfortable.
The boat is easy to load on and off the trailer, however when it comes to launching it the ramp better be deep. I pull Destiny with a Nissan pickup and the back tires and muffler are under water when I launch.
Very easy to step the mast (single handed)
NOTE: 1/4 berths, I don't believe any adult can sleep there. The first time I spend the night on Destiny I tried and there wasn't enough room (space) for me to turn over and I'm 5'8 and 150 pounds. So it's only good for kids and pets.
Forget pointing close to the wind, isn't going to happen.
V-berth my feet hung-out 2 feet past the v-berth so it's a must that you put the table down so your feet have a place to rest.
I would be happy to share additional imformation if you e-mail me.
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Review Date: Fri April 6, 2001 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

The Carbon Fiber mast. This is really the reason I bought the boat. I was dreaming of it taking 2 minutes for me to rig the mast by myself at the boat ramp, without having to deal with shroud lines, etc. The reality? YES! It is amazingly simply to put the mast up. The 27' mast weighs 33#. You just put the bolt through on the mast step, and push the mast up as you walk forward. It is secured by a 2' sliding aluminum tube INSIDE the mast which couples the mast to the step on the deck. It is an amazingly good idea. 2 minutes(if that) to rig. Very little grunting and groaning on my part. The traveling rig has a stainless post with a semicircular padded rest for the mast. It sticks into a tube permanently attached to the rudder.


Simplicity. The sail controls are pretty simple, The "boom" is a 1" fiberglass rod that fits into a 3' stainless steel tube attached to the bottom of the mast. The foot tension is adjusted with a velcro pocket (like some batten pockets on other boats). This has proved to be too simple, and does not provide good control of foot tension, prevents a good reffing arrangement to provide good sail shap while reefed, and prevents addition of a boom vang. I solved this by replacing the batten with a conventional aluminum boom, and recutting the mainsail.

The halyard is a bit different than normal; it has a small block that you attach to the head of the sail, and that block travels up the mast when you pull up the main halyard. I guess the idea is to give you some more leverage to get all those battens to the top. It was still impossible to get coorect luff tension, so I eliminated the block, and mounted a small winch on the mast.

The sail has 6 full battens along it's length, with one reef point that has reef lines sewed into it. It is important to let the sail fly in the wind (easily down by unclipping the mainsheet... the mast will turn to point the mainsail track downwind) when raising the main to minimize binding of the sail slugs (one per batten) when you raise the sail. Otherwise, it can take quite a bit of effort to get the sail up. The sails are made by Super Sailmakers, and appear to be of decent construction.


Interior. It is small inside. No big surprise. 2 quarter berths, a cramped V-berth. The support board for the V-berth doubles as a table that mounts on a post in the cockpit (nice touch). You can also rearrange the board and cushions to give you a comfortable chair facing aft looking out the companionway hatch. There is space for a sink and stove underneath boards that swing upward. I am not sure how utilitarian this is. I think I would be more likely to cook and wash dishes in the cockpit. The boat comes equipped with a "safety pack" to meet coast guard requirements (lifejackets, cushion, flaregun, whistle).


Sailing. It is different to sail a boat that you don't constantly tweak this line and that... because you can't. Racers probably wouldn't like this simplistic approach. The advantage to this comes at the ramp... every single one of those extra tweaking lines would normally have to be attached every time you raised the mast. The boat behaves well under sail. I was worried about how the rudder would handle (since the more "classic" cat boats with their "barn-door" rudders can develop a bit of weather helm). No problems. The rudder is counterbalanced, and exhibits NO weather helm. You can let go of the helm at any point of sail, and the rudder will stay where it is (at least for a short while). It is very stable for a boat this size... it doesn't list much at all when you move around the deck. It seems to be less "tippy" than my Tanzer 22, which has 3100# displacement... more than double the size. I suspect that the wings on the keel act to stop alot of the rocking motion when you move around... sort of like the anti-rocking devices some people suspend over the side of their boats when at anchor. My wife really likes the bimini cover, which we can put up while we are sailing (a must for the hot summer months in Charleston, SC). The boat is fairly stable, and you can sail hands off for the most part. Actually, you can pretty much control direction of the boat by sheeting in or out on the mainsheet. One of the difficult things to get used to is sailing without a jib. There is no warning you are about to go into irons (like a jib starting to luff)... the boat just slows down and then stops. The boat is easy to control... I have never had a problem tacking, even in the lightest of winds. No need to ever backwind the main to get out of irons. The shoal draft keel has decent sized wings. With modifications discussed above, the boat delivers decent windward performance. It definitely likes heeling 10-15 degrees... it is very stable when heeled over. The boat will get in a groove and track well to windward. I can tack through 75-80 degrees if I pinch, but cat boats definitely do better if you crack them off the wind a little bit. When sailing upwind, my GPS gives me about 100-105 degrees between tacks, which accounts for leeway being made. This is decent for a shoal draft boat. The stability when heeled was unexpected, and is real nice. You definitely need to sail with 10-15 degrees of heel, because it allows the wings to bite deeper in the water and really gives you a boost to windward.

Quality of construction. This boat is obviosuly on the lower end of Hake's much vaunted high quality line. The opening ports are plastic, and the electric panel has fuses instead of breakers. The boat is very solidly built, with a end cored balsa in appropriate places for stiffness, as well as the addition of 3/8" plywood reinforcement underneath selected areas (like seats), making it very strong. There are some flaws in the gelcoat, but overall seems to be a very solid boat. Two areas of concern: no backing plates were installed under any hardware, and some rough edges inside where the ceiling and the floor pan do not meet at the edges.


Complete review:
http://www.geocities.com/tmarks11/
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Pat92Fox
Junior Member

Registered: October 2009
Location: NE Wisconsin
Review Date: Tue October 27, 2009 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10 

 
Pros: Solid and stable. Very well built
Cons: Points poorly

My 1992 Sloop-rigged Seaward fox is named MISTRESS. I have owned her for two seasons now and can claim (for me) that she is the perfect single-hand small boat. Reasonably comfortable for one, and adequate for cruising (weekender). Her lines are unique and she gets a lot of complements wherever she goes.
I am the 4th owner and can find no faults in her quality or design. Some improvements I have made and would recommend include:
1) 135 Genoa, tracks and cam cleats at the gunnels. The standard 100 Jib is good for heavy winds, but for better performance at least a 135 is recommended.
2) Boomkicker and soft Vang. Noticeable improvement in downwind performance and no fussing with lazy jacks. Well worth the $$. Found the best deal for the Boomkicker here on Sailnet store.
3) Run sheets aft to Cockpit with Harken cheek blocks and Spinlock closed cleats.
4) Added a simple Jib downhaul consisting of small block at the bow and 1in. brass rings on the forestay. 3/16in. line to the port cleat on the cabin side is all it takes.
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