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Home » Sailnet Boat Reviews » S - Boats starting with 'S' » Seaward

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Seaward 23
Reviews Views Date of last review
7 4903 Sun March 4, 2001
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers None indicated None indicated












Description: Seaward 23
Keywords: Seaward 23
 


Author
administrator

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Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Thu December 12, 1996 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:




23' Cat Rig with Carbon Fiber Mast
Free standing Carbon Fiber mast with fully battened main, 2' Winged keel with 850 lbs lead ballast, lifelines, bowsprit & pulpit, cat bird seats, roomy cockpit.

Strengths - Very fast off the wind. Points ok but not great.
Set up time (solo) is about 20 minutes. To tear it down takes about an 30 minutes. Putting the mast up and down is a bit tricky, but there are methods to do this without killing yourself.

The boat trailers and launches incredibly well(I do it solo with no problems!). I recommend a four wheel sport utility or truck for towing. If you get stuck at the launch the four wheel comes in handy. The boat is comfortable and dry and looks great.

This boat is designed and built to be a trailable coastal cruiser, it is not a "Blue Water" vessel so don't plan any Bermuda cruises. Large washers used for staunchions instead of backing plates.

The rivets used on the main sail track are too small (mine ripped out while sailing one day), I riveted in 3/16" stainless steel replacements. Recently (9/24/99) the top track ripped out of the mast. I will have to add a backing plate and bolt the top end of it.. Big problem because the sail got stuck on a rivet and I could not get it down. I had to lower the mast with the sail still up! Hake should do something about this as it's getting to be a PAIN IN THE ASS!!!

The cat rig "V" berth is cramped due to compression post in the middle of it (however I'm fairly large at 6'3" 225lbs).
The main sail needs second reef points. The mast transport system is inadequate. Need forward mast supports instead of using the bow pulpit to lash the mast to.

The boom crutch (supports the boom from the stern while in transit) is not very robust (one of the bolts tore loose while underway). It is important to stabilize the mast while in transit. I tie a line around the mast and tie to the handrails. This reduces sway. Also, tie the mast crutch down.

Recently I noticed that the port catbird seat is starting to bend downwards. This is due to the seat being used as a "pull" when getting on the boat from the swimladder. The seat on the port side should be supported with an extra stauntion. The forward hatch leaked in heavy rain, I re-silicone calked it to fix it.

The sail rig (cat rig with large main) precludes gybing in medium to heavy winds. During a gybe, the boom will lift up and become parallel to the mast, with the sail wrapping around the mast. This will wreak havoc on your main sail as the battons try to rip through the batton pockets (yes, this happened to me). A boom vang is a good idea.

Also, the boom has two ears on the gooseneck fitting which MUST be filed off, if not the gooseneck can be damaged during a gybe in heavier wind.

I added a larger main sheet block & hexaratchet block and a windward sheeting car. This makes it easier to sail in heavier winds. Also, the traveler car provided came apart while sailing one day, requiring the upgrade.

The rudder hit a log or something and the bolts on the bottom gudgeon buried themselves into the transom fibreglass. I reglassed the area but will add a backing plate to these bolts. This made me nervous as heavier seas could have torn out these bolts rather easily. HAKE Yachts should definitely put a backing plate here.

Overall Satisfaction - Good. It's taken me a while to get the hang of sailing this rig as it's not at all like sailing a sloop. However, the more that I sail and understand it the better I like it. The boat suits it's purpose (Lake sailing and coastal cruising) very well. It's a solid boat that can take heavier weather. I sail in heavy winds frequently (usually solo) and the boat stays dry and handles well.
In most instances the factory and Nick Hake have taken care of my problems, although sometimes it will take a while.

The boat has room for up to 4 adults and some kids for day sailing. Overnights - two adults two children would be about the most that you can expect.







































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Review Date: Sun September 21, 1997 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:





Ga Tempo 1988 SEAWARD 22/23 CALL: " Tempo" TYPE: Shoal Draft Cruiser RIG: Fractional Rig Sloop ENGINE: 8hp Tohatsu long shaft electric start L..O.A: 24' 6'' Pulpit 22' 8'' Less L.W.L: 22' 7'' BEAM; 8' 4'' DRAFT: 1' 11'' C. B. up 3' 5'' C. B. dn DISP: 2200# BALLAST: 750# MAST HT: 30' A.W.L. SAIL PLAN: Full Battened Main Self Tending Jib SAIL AREA 218 sq. ft.TANKAGE: Fuel: 6 gal Water: 2 gal


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ACCOMODATIONS & LAYOUT

Forward "V" berth for two enclosed in its own cabin, sliding door access. Port-a potty and storage bin under "V" berth, ventilation provided by overhead hatch & two stainless steel opening ports with screens. The main salon contains two-quarter berths (7' 1'' & 6' 6"), there are four additional SS opening ports with screens for ventilation in addition to main sliding hatchway that is fully screened. Storage located under both berths. Battery box located in starboard storage bin and supported for 360* movement.

GALLY

Starboard side has a sink with a fresh water pump adjacent to forward cabin door. A gimbal mounted alcohol two burner stove is located under the starboard quarter berth. An insulated icebox is located and secured from moving on the port side and is accessible from both the cabin and cockpit. A swing down table is located on the port side and slides to cabin center for use. An additional removable shelf is adjacent to the stove and doubles as a cockpit table.

ELECTRONICS AND NAVAGATION EQUIPMENT

* Autohelm Autopilot 1000 * Richie Compass
* Uniden Depth Sounder * Horizon VHF

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM

* 12 volt battery * 6 circuit electric panel
* 12 volt exterior running lights * 12 volt interior lights
* VHF * Depth Sounder
* Autohelm * Compass night light

HULL/DECK & SAILS/RIGGING

Last of shoal draft keel design with swing SS centerboard (1988), draft 1' 11" centerboard up to 3' 5" centerboard down. Hull is hand laid fiberglass. Deck/Sails/Rigging was Beta for new 1989 23' design. Bow pulpit, life lines, cabin house grab rails, tiller steering. Aluminum mast is deck steeped with welded out rigger that moves top of backstay aft 24''. This allows additional roach in fully battened Main. Self-tending Jib has single batten acting as boom. Jib sheets led to pair of #6 Lemwar winches thru blocks on tracks along deck. Single #8 Barrnet winch mounted on cabin roof for Main halyard. Mast has Main and Jib halyards internal. Boom has internal led lines for topping lift, slab reefing & clew tension line. All lines are led aft to cockpit via turning blocks and stoppers allowing single handling. All additional hardware mounted with backing plates.
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administrator

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Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Fri April 24, 1998 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

My 1990 sloop-rig model was purchased used in 1995. It has an outboard (there are models w/ an inboard diesel), and is equipped w/ Edson wheel steering and Crusing Design roller furling. It is a great boat for cruising w/ lots of interior space (living & storage)for a trailerable boat, also the cockpit is very comfortable w/ 4 adults, and is somewhat protected from the spray. The boat is quite fast off the wind, points reasonably high, and handles larger seas & winds well, if you remember to reef..... Set up time is approximately 45 minutes w/ 2 people, the launching & retrieving are a cinch, as the trailer was designed for the boat, instead of the other way around. I am extremely happy w/ the quality of hardware, fit & finish--it is a "Cadillac" trailer sailor, but you get what you pay for. My boat, trailer, & equipment weigh approx. 3800 lbs, and I use a Mercury Grand Marquis as a tow vehicle. I will go on the record saying that this is the last boat I will buy (it's #5) as it meets my needs extremely well.
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administrator

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Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Tue January 12, 1999 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

A high quality trailerable boat with freestanding carbon fiber mast and a shallow winged keel. Easy to sail boat but I ran into a few potential problems. When sailing on a run in a potential jibing situation the large full batten sail can wrap around the forward side of the unstayed mast. An uncontrolled jibe then will result in the cast aluminum boom fitting fracturing before the mast can rotate . I've fitted a boom vang to reduce the boom lift. A second potential problem is the mast lowering which can be difficult with a rotating 39' mast with no stays.

In general I've enjoyed the boat a great deal. I've used in principally for daysailing with a couple of weekends. Its a great light air boat and the big main pulls the boat along like a spinnaker on downwind legs.
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administrator

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Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Thu May 6, 1999 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Nala is the first of her breed, a deep keel Seaward 23 designed for those of us who sail in high winds and waves and keep the boat in the water. She draws 4'2" with a skeg on her keel and a 900 pound lead bulb at the bottom of the keel.

She has an inboard diesel, a carbon fiber cat rig, wheel steering and a marine head - instead of a porta-potti whose contents can adorn the person who empties it.

I have had her a year now on San Francisco Bay, and I like her very much. She sails differently from a sloop, and I do a lot of chicken gybing, but she is fun, incredibly stable and fast.

Nick Hake and Dave and crew have been incredibly helpful. I was given a redesigned rudder for her after the first one didn't seem to have enough bite. Shipped and sent totally without charge to me.

I'm thinking of adding a boom vang for better downwind performance. On a run her boom tends to come up a bit with the puffs and spill the wind. It would also give the crew something to do.

Another owner has put a Dutchman gybe control system on and swears by it. I haven't decided whether I wish to do that yet.

I will say that I could leave my old dock at Grand Marina on the Alameda Estuary, get her trimmed right, and tack all the way out to the Bay without the crew having to trim once.

She had a problem with her mainsheet lower block scraping the varnish off her hatch slides, but we solved that by moving the sheet block back - and we may put it back where it was since a wonderful Kiwi came into our lives and showed us a trick with a piece of bungee cord.

She had a very minor forward hatch leak, solved with an application of sealant to one spot.

She has an excellent anchor roller on her bow sprit. Her anchor storage and launching is the best I've seen on a little coastal cruiser. It has one minor drawback - the chain locker drains under the V-Berth, so we leave the rode out on deck in a mesh bag to dry after anchoring - which is probably better for the rode anyway.

The catbird seats are best in port or with light people. With the helmsperson and two folks in the catbird seats, her tail drags - which is to be expected in a 23 foot boat that weighs 3,000 pounds.

The engine is very accessible, and it's cover forms the companionway steps. It is designed so that if need be, it can be lifted out by using a block and tackle on the boom.

For San Francisco Bay, I have two reef points. I am going to add a third between the present first reef point and the second reef point - in certain conditions full sail is too much sail, and one reef is too little sail.



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Review Date: Wed August 2, 2000 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

(Updated August 2000 - Season #4.)

First race victory, second place non-spinnaker class, achieved in the Alberta Offshore Sailing Association / Edmonton Yacht Club Fun Race, non-PHRF event July 22, 2000.

Purchased the boat brand new in 1997. One year warranty throughout. Five years on the hull with respect to osmotic blistering. When needed, it's easy to find parts. Excellent stainless hardware used throughout. This boat is fast for its type and a joy to sail. Pluses: Stable, well built, seakindly and very fast downwind with good upwind performance with the addition of a 100 percent jib.

Easily singlehanded even in 25 knots (max. range of the first reef. Owners of this boat and rig are sailing it up to 32 knots with no jib.)

In 15-20 knots of wind expect 4 to 5 knots on a beat and up to 6 to 7 knots on a broad reach/run. For general cruising using the main by itself works very well although it requires good sailing technique to get the most out of it. Without the jib, the boat sails like a dinghy in this carbon fibre mast configuration. With the jib, the boat points higher and the main is more easily managed. Adding a cunningham cringle and a boom-vang helps significantly with sail management especially on a full run. Several owners of this rig have found ways to move the halyards back to the stern which includes the use of a winch.

The boat is responsive with no unpleasant surprises. Has a comfortable interior suitable for two adults and two children. Forepeak, for example, is comfortable for an adult up to 6 feet 2 inches and weighing about 185 lbs. Adults weighing more may feel cramped with the mast post in the centre. Excellent fibreglass layup and good quality stainless hardware throughout.

The carbon fibre spar itself is quite strong. No problems to date with how much it flexes. However, the top seven or eight rivets holding the 11/16" stainless steel track at top of the mast have been problematic. (I should note, the manufacturer has now dealt with this matter for all future spars.) For my spar, I opted to install a two foot stainless steel "Thompson" backing plate(1/2" wide x 1/8" thick) inside the spar to cover the top seven rivets. To date, my fix has proven itself very well.

Highly recommend bottom painting the hull. Used VC-Tar and VC17M for use on a large inland lake with wonderful results.

Satisfaction Overall: Very pleased with the boat's overall performance and construction quality. The ability to singlehand easily is a great plus!! Other boat owners on the large inland lake I sail on acknowledge the boat's versatility and that its rig is quite powerful, especially now that I am up in the race pack -- even though it is NOT a racing boat. With the addition of the jib, the boat is now both definitely very fast off the wind -- and points high going upwind! Without the jib, it can take time to get the boat going again after a tack although there is a dingy technique to correct for this challenge. Regardless, if you are family cruising, how fast you tack isn't much of a problem. However, for club racing where tacking and rounding the mark makes the difference between a first, second or third place finish, a jib is a necessity.































































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Review Date: Sun March 4, 2001 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

In 1999 I purchased a fully equipped Seaward 23 sloop, manufactured by Hake Yachts. What a nightmare! I spent the next 6 months on repairs and attempting to get the manufacturer and dealer to accept responsibility for the defects. I met with little success. Finally, in frustration, I sold the boat in August 1999 at a significant loss. If you would like details, please contact me at (303)674-6506.
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