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Home » Sailnet Boat Reviews » W - Boats starting with 'W' » Westerly
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Westerly Pageant 23
Reviews Views Date of last review
5 7584 Tue July 25, 2006
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers None indicated 10.0












Description: Westerly Pageant 23
Keywords: Westerly Pageant 23
 


Author
administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Thu December 17, 1998 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Excellent living space below with almost 6' headroom.
STRONGLY built. Excellent heavy weather boat.
Almost no spray in the cockpit in a seaway.
Better than a Flicka
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administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Mon November 22, 1999 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:


1978 version.
Twin keel, sloop, 5 berth.
Strongly built (Lloyd's Certificate) and very stable in heavy weather, loads of space. Large, safe cockpit.
Easy to sail with small crew or singlehanded.
Not the quickest boat on the water - but it will get you there.

Front cabin - two berths, one adult other child or can fit board to convert to double.
Hanging space - OK but needs work to make useful.
Heads - Plenty of room to sit and think. Also space for modifications - e.g. extra hanging space.
Main cabin - Dinette can convert to double berth, and port side sea-berth brings total berths to 5 (excluding the space under the starboard side coaming - which serves as stowage for sail bags and other gubbins).
However, five adults is definitely a crowd. My lot are two adults and three children (4 yr, 8yr and 11 yr). Plenty of space for us.
Cooker, sink and lots of locker space very practical. Again small amount of work to provide sink top provides additional work space.
Dinette table provides satisfactory chart table.

Very happy with this boat - suits the family for weekends and a smaller crew of three for longer periods.

Brian


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Review Date: Sun December 10, 2000 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Cited in "Heart of Glass," a book about the early (now classic) fiberglass boats, as an example of homeliness, this somewhat chubby Laurent Giles-designed pocket-cruiser has many virtues that soon make an owner look at her with affection. Built solid, with Lloyd's Certification, she carries half her weight in her twin cast iron keels, making her remarkably safe and well-behaved for a 23' just-over-two-ton boat. (A Pageant recently sailed from Florida to Bermuda and back, but had to cancel its planned trans-Atlantic run because of strong headwinds.) These boats are sprightlier to sail in medium-light wind than the famed globe-encircling Westerly Centaurs (which are 50% heavier and 3 feet longer, though not as much longer along their waterline and, hence, not much faster) and so they are ideal for a combination of day-sailing and coastal cruising.

Her interior room is almost the same as the Centaur's, except that the V berth is smaller, suitable for children but cramped for an adult. However, the head is spacious, and, when the door to the main cabin is closed there's plenty of private space, and a hatch that can be opened. Not bad for 23'. The cockpit is comfortable for four, but can seat six, and remains remarkably dry, due to the height of the cabin, which acts as effective barrier to spay and wind. In heavy weather this boat does very well, but must be reefed earlier than a larger, heavier boat--at about 15 to 17 kts. Once reefed it seems ready to go anywhere, but isn't very close-winded, especially in heavy weather (which is probably why the trans-Atlantic crew turned back to Bermuda after two days of making no progress in heavy head winds). In anything under 20 kts, it sails a decent, but unremarkable 45 degrees off the wind. As it heels, its leeward keel goes deeper into the water, giving the boat a deeper (actually vertical) keel eventually, and this helps windward performance. It needs more steering close hauled in heavy weather, or on a broad reach, than a heavier boat with a full keel would, but on a close or beam reach it can be steered easily by a tiller auto pilot to give its crew a rest.

My version has an outboard (9.9 hp) which easily drives the boat at hull speed (about 5.8 kts) but whose high rpm droning can be annoying on long passages under power, unless you can think of a song to harmonize with it. Of course, an outboard prop bounces out of the water when heading directly into the wind; the solution is to motor sail at a slight angle--much more stable. The cabin has plenty of storage, with or without an inboard engine. There are vast lockers underneath seats and berths, and handy smaller cabinets with transparent doors, so you can see where everything is. The L shaped dinette, whose table descends to make a small-ish double berth (very comfortable for one, OK for two if both are not too heavy-set), makes a good surface for reading, writing, or chart work. The stove is close to the bulkhead of the forward cabin, unfortunately, rather than near the companionway.

My boat settles on the hard twice a day in the tidal inlet down from our house, and so far, in five years, there's been no loosening of the keels or leaks. The original gelcoat under the sometimes-flaking bottom paint still shines, and there have been absolutely no blisters on the hull. This boat, with its over-built rigging, its thickly laid-up hull, and enormous stainless steel keel bolts, seems likely to outlive a number of owners, possibly lasting for half-a-century or more. Its topsides weather, of course, but could probably look wonderful with some sort of Awlgrip finish. Still, this isn't a boat to be loved for its looks but for its sturdy and practical character. With two folding bicyles in the forward cabin, and plenty of time on shore to stretch one's legs, it's possible to live on this boat, even for days at a time. Healed over at 30 degrees (it won't ever heel any more) and foaming along at 5+ kts in a good breeze, this boat is a lot of fun to sail, too. Drawing a mere 2'10" it can explore many places other sailboats cannot and takes a lot of anxiety out of sailing in shoaly waters. They will never make a twin-keeler like this again--too stubby looking, and too expensive to produce--but quite a few were made from 1970 through the late seventies (something like 700, I think), and they should be valued for their quality contruction and practical (if not all-that-graceful) design.
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txflyboy
Junior Member

Registered: July 2006
Posts: 1
Review Date: Tue July 25, 2006 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Iagree on the construction. I'm restoreing a 73 pagent hull #162 and the its amazing. as a retiree i do plan on living on this boat for a few weeks to see just how comfortable it can get.
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txflyboy
Junior Member

Registered: July 2006
Posts: 1
Review Date: Tue July 25, 2006 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 10 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Iagree on the construction. I'm restoreing a 73 pagent hull #162 and the its amazing. as a retiree i do plan on living on this boat for a few weeks to see just how comfortable it can get.
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