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Home » Sailnet Boat Reviews » B - Boats starting with 'B' » Bristol
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Bristol 24
Reviews Views Date of last review
7 4594 Thu December 20, 2012
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers $4,500.00 9.0












Description: Bristol 24
Keywords: Bristol 24
 


Author
administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Sat June 13, 1998 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Bristol 24 Corsair, standard model
Very roomy, 8 foot beam and 6 foot ceiling. Very stable on the water.
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Review Date: Tue June 22, 1999 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

The Bristol 24 is a full keel minicruiser with an outboard well aft. She is a sturdy boat which inspires confidence and handles rough seas well.
Interior has great cabinetry. Galley is to stbd, drop-table and settee to port. Mine has 1 quaterberth (very tight, best for storage), and storage on the other side. Deep sump keeps the floor pretty dry when heeled. There's room for two batteries under the step. Head or porta-potti, and water tank are under v-berth.
Deck support under mast is an arch in cabin roof, prone to cracking (like many similar boats with deck stepped masts and no post). I added a compression column along door to forward cabin with good success to stabilize.
Because outboard is aft of rudder, and the full keel, she is hard to maneuver under power. Rotating the outboard slightly to turn helps tremendously, and corrects this problem. The outboard well is great to keep propeller in water and motor dry and secure.
She tracks great upwind, but tends to drift and need frequent corrections downwind, giving my autopilot a hard time.
Overall, a solid and enjoyable yacht.
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administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Mon December 6, 1999 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Hey Everybody,
First off, I don't have alot of info I can pass along about the B24 seaworthyness or cruising ability as I haven't really gone anywhere, YET (soon to come). I do have info about what I like so far and what I have found in need of repair after its 32 years of existence.
I bought "Sea Urchin" in Nov '98 with intentions of fixing the crucial bits and then taking off for the Bahamas within months of buying her, but.... I have lived aboard her since Dec '98 and found her to be quite livable (though I am a bit of a minimalist). Even at 6'2", I don't find the lacking 2"s of headroom to be that much of a bother. However I have a few scars on my scalp from the training period. A small price to pay for the cheapness of living aboard such a small yacht. I have to say though, you will not find a more roomy production boat of the same length.
I have sailed her numerous afternoons and weekends but not nearly as many as I would have liked. With the layout and equipment she came with it takes me about an hour to convert her from livaboard to setting sail. Again, a small price to pay for the sunset sails in the warm trades found in the Keys. If you plan on living aboard AND sailing, think through the conversion process and make the changes (BEFORE you move aboard. It is very difficult to live aboard a 24' boat of which you are rearranging the interior)needed to be able to cast the lines off in about 15-30 mins. You will sail more and enjoy life more.
Some of the problems I have found are:
Deck delamination. It is a balsa cored deck on the '68 and I suspect unless the boat had loving owners its entire life, it will have deck core problems (check for softness around anything that penetrates the deck). Fortunately, this isn't as bad as it sounds. Unless exstinsive it is not to difficult to fix by the DYIer.
Rotting main bulkhead due to leaks around chain plates (a common on any boat with chainplates through the deck). Im solving this by moving the plates outside to the hull.
Poor installation of forward bulk head. You can see it pushing out on the exterior of the hull. Could just be a problem with mine. I will fix this too. They really should have put foam between the hull and the edges of the bulkheads, but hey, its a production boat.
General interior workmanship I find to be a bit rough, but I don't think strength is a problem.
The hull I believe to be bombproof (no blisters) as are many of the 1960s boats. Check the through-hulls though.
Thats about it for the true problems I have found, not bad for a $3500.00 boat you can liveaboard.

As for its sailing ability, I feel at a loss to really comment. "Sea Urchin" came with an old, miss cut mainsail that gives her a lot of weather helm even with all the tweaking I can muster. So, until I get the new one (on order, god I can't wait) a report on windward performance will have to wait. I can say that the downwind abilities are quite satisfactory. The helm needs attention in short choppy stuff just because the boat is rather and gets thrown about, but shes dry and never fails to stay on top of the waves and thats a nice quality in a boat.
If your going to cruise her as I am, she will need a few things in my opinion. She certainly didn't come off the line ready to set sail for the south seas, but with her general design and hull construction she has the basic requirments to build from. I like her, I trust her, and I'm excited to be heading for the trades in the winter of 2000. If I come back I'll post what more I found out.
If your looking for a cheap (usually) first boat, pocket cruiser, livaboard, gunkholer or daysailer, I dont think you could go wrong with the Bristol 24. Just keep in mind that she is likely to need more work than it seems at first(they're 25-35 years old), but given the other production 24 footers (or even 25/26 footers)out there, I think she will be worth the work.
Happy Sailing,
Biff aboard "Sea Urchin"
Cayo Hueso, Fl
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bfrtech
Junior Member

Registered: March 2001
Review Date: Thu January 31, 2002 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

I have owned my Bristol 24 for about two years now and find that it is a very responsive, sturdy classic. I have sailed her on the Chesapeake on some very windy days and she has handled beautifully. She is stiff heading into the winding and tracks very well. My boat is 35 years old and her hull is in excellent condition with the original gelcoat.

The hull and decks are very rigid and thick. I have heard stories of these boats falling off shipping trucks on the way to boat shows and surviving the fall. To prove the strength of the hull the boat was actually taken to the boat show.

If you are looking for an older classic with beautiful lines and fantastic construction this might be the boat for you.
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heh708
Junior Member

Registered: December 2001
Review Date: Tue June 18, 2002 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

I love this little boat, which I have owned for more than 20 years. But I am old and sick now. I simply can't handle it anymore. It is great for day sailing, or a long weekend - especially if you have kids in the 8 to 12 range. It does quite well in heavy weather.

The boat has always been maintained professionally, and I think it is in excellent shape. It is very dry; most of the bilge gets in from above rather than below. It has a nearly new suit of Doyle sails, including a full-battened main. The old sails are available if you want them. The motor (an Evinrude 9.9 long shaft) has been over maintained by a shop on City Island that is the best I have ever encountered. The radio is also nearly new. Over the years I have added several design features that have been very helpful, especially in the engine well -- which used to fill up with water but now has a simple auto drain that keeps it dry.

Contact me, and I will point you to anchorage where the boat is moored.. Make a bid; I want to do business.

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Review Date: Fri March 26, 2004 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

My Bristol 24 is a fairly heavy cruiser. I sail the central coast of California and the typical summer wind is 18-24 knots with a 4-6 foot swell. I needed a boat that could handle stiff winds and small breaking waves; she handles them well, although I find myself sailing these waters with a double reefed main and a heavy 70 sq.foot jib. She's initially a bit tender and then stiffens up as she heels with no sudden motions. Also I reef early and keep my foretriangle larger than my main at all times to balance her and fend off excessive weather helm which she has a tendancy to exhibit when overcanvassed. She was beat and nearly on her way to the shredder when I found her in San Francisco, but in the last 3 years I've slowly been rebuilding her. Her bottom is epoxied, holes filled, rudder post, stem, bearings all redone, and the deck has been rebuilt and painted with new portlights in her cabin. The deck hardware and rudder fittings were all cheap cast aluminum which didn't fair well in the long run. They've all been replaced. Hull to deck connection is strong, but poorly designed with s.s. staples and glass on inside. It's also easily damaged since it's an outward flange. Stand up headroom is wonderful.
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Skip20
Skip20

Registered: December 2012
Location: Buzzards Bay
Posts: 8
Review Date: Thu December 20, 2012 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: $4,500.00 | Rating: 9 

 
Pros: Paul Cobel's design, over-built, sea-kindly and snug.
Cons: Hull to deck join, cored decks, rigging i.e. double lowers, chain plate placement - IMHO

The Bristol Sailstar 24 is a superlative sailboat for single-handing or a young family cruise anywhere on the East Coast or Bahamas. With appropriate gear and experience, there is no reason not to take her off-shore.

She will outlast you in rough conditions. With the exception of a Com-Pac 16 for a decade (and now in trust for my grandson), I've cruised my Sailstar 24 for many years - Maine to the Keys and Bahamas.

In sum, best boat of her size for cruising.
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