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Home » Sailnet Boat Reviews » C - Boats starting with 'C' » Cape Dory
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Cape Dory Typhoon overnighter
Reviews Views Date of last review
3 10903 Sat August 23, 2008
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers None indicated 8.0












Description: Cape Dory Typhoon overnighter
Keywords: Cape Dory Typhoon overnighter
 


Author
administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Fri December 20, 1996 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

The Cape Dory Typhoon, is a classic Carl Alberg design fractional
sloop. They were built by the Cape Dory company prior to them
going out of production. I believe that the molds are now owned
by Nauset Marine, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The sloop is advertised
as an overnighter, and originally was equiped with a overboard
discharge marine head. Only the most flexible and easily accomodated
could spend a nite on this craft. However, many times I enjoyed
the basic pup-tent accomodations embracing the very minimal
place to lay ones head and not much else. The stars seem more
brilliant from the "cabin" of this pocket cruiser.
The construction of the Ty was generally very good, with
heavy glass lay-up and minimal blistering problems. The 800lb
ballast was inside the glass keel, no worry about the keel bolts
failing. The outboard bracket will usually need new wood every
few years, no big deal. The common engine on the early boats was the
venerable British Seagull. The Seagull is still available for
those of you purest. The combination of the Ty and a seagull
is guaranteed to reward the owner with offers to pay for drinks
by any envious sailors who seek the early simple days of sailing
that is so easily lost in this nuts world. The Seagull is great
will last for ever, will start every time if you strictly adhear
to the sequence of starting proceedures. Step out of sequence
and you can pull the start cord until Iran wins the Americas
Cup and you will not get a pop from the engine. More reasonable is a
two cylinder 6hp outboard, fewer drinks, more fillings stay in
your teeth and you can talk and run simultaneously.
The decking, least I not digress on someother engine rave, seems
subject to some surface cracking as does the cockpit sole. The
teak coamings need to be replaced in twenty years. The boat sails
great, like a much bigger boat and can be mussled and pushed
off the bottom, should you run the 2'10" keel into 2'8" water.
I've owned two Typhoons one in Florida, and one in the Chesapeake
would sail either one anywhere near shore, don't assume that
because it looks like a bluewater boat it is, remember its
18'6" and we have all seen waves bigger than that. The port windows
need mentioning, they are plastic lenses glued into the metal
ports, and will "pop" out at almost any time. I sold my last
Ty to a friend who still has it and it is a very low maintence
easy boat to own and sail, good recognition in any harbor, easy
to maintain, trailer, it just aint no liveaboard. I once met
a guy who was completely rebuilding the Ty for blue water ocean
passage. I wonder if he is still with us?
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administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Mon June 28, 1999 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

The 19 foot Typhoons were made in two versions, weekenders and daysailors. The daysailors have a large cockpit and masthead rig. The weekenders have a small cabin with four berths and a fractional rig. Mine is a weekender. It is indeed a lovely and very fine sailing boat. Faster than you would expect due to it's narrow beam and large sail area. I have beaten scows in light, zepher airs as it has good weight that carries it through the lulls. I love to singlehand as the mainsheet is behind the tiller and the jib sheets right beside. For a full keeled boat she turns responsively. She points well while traking much straighter than newer, roomier boats. With a properly sized mainsail the helm is light. Don't add a new one with too much roach! Cape Dory built over 2000 and most are still going I believe. They were heavily built and can take some abuse. Some things to look out for are "Cabin Sag" where the mast compresses the cabin top if the rig is overtightened or the boat is sailed hard for years. This is easily remedied by adding a post in the cabin. The decks were cored with balsa, check that hardware was rebedded properly. The teak does need oil once a month or Sikkens or varnish, whatever, as if you let it go you have to sand and that can start to make it thin. Look for indents in the hull from improper storage;mine has a 3/4 inch indent on one side due to this. There is no decrease in performance and it is structurally fine. The mast is easy to step and unstep, though it takes a little planning. The prices range from $2000 to $7000. You should be able to pick up a healthy one for around $4000. Once you sail her though you won't sell her. I love this boat and all who walk past her stop and gawk, giving me much too big an ego! I think the new bronze portlights from ABI inc helped alot!
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Review Date: Sat August 23, 2008 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 8 

 
Pros: very stable easy to sail
Cons: cabin liner

I added a Torqeedo 801 long shaft electric outboard with two grp 31 batteries, one in bilge under vee berth, one between thru hulls. It will drive over 4 knots at max thrust, 800 watts, or 3 knots at 300 watts. Will run at 3 knots for many hours. It is a fun boat to sail. With 130% genoa it does nicely in even very light winds.
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