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Home » Sailnet Boat Reviews » C - Boats starting with 'C' » Columbia
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Columbia 28
Reviews Views Date of last review
3 940 Wed December 4, 2002
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers None indicated None indicated












Description: Columbia 28
Keywords: Columbia 28
 


Author
administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Fri January 24, 1997 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:










Purchased Vessel Over a Year ago, boat had been in dry dock for 7 years. I spent the next 8 months rebuilding, refitting and replacing gear and electronics and equipment. This model has an OB motor in a well. After several newer inboard boats it is a pleasure to have the ob model even though there is some drag, I dont notice it. I had some modifications to make regarding exhaust in the engine well choking the engine but now it works great and all controls are remote. I have little information other than the mast is 32', keel 3000 lbs,width 8' and length 28'. I would like more info if any one has a spec sheet. Standing room for most of the cabin for 6' and under. large efficient ice box. I have installed pressure water system and all propane, heat, stave and BBQ. I have original sails which are in excellent shape. I think the jib is 150% at least. Old roller furl but after repair it works great. The interior is teak on marine ply and in excellent condition. My wife and I are 5' 9" and have plenty of room in the v berth, at least as much room as our previous 1984 Catalina 30. Of the 5 boats we have owned since 1988 this is the best sailing of the bunch for cruising. We sail from south Puget Sound North the the Canadian Islands and have been in all kinds of wind and weather and sea conditions and the Columbia sails safer, more stable and faster than any of our previous boats. It seems to sail best in heavy weather. At approx 30 knots it sails well with just the jib. I would appreciate any info anyone has regarding the Columbia 28. I am looking for a bow cap and hatch hinges if anyone knows where I can find parts. Thx Dan Simmons


























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roland693
Junior Member

Registered: January 2004
Location: aboard 41 Coronado
Posts: 7
Review Date: Wed December 4, 2002 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

28-foot Columbia, S/N 425

List of items which go with the boat (2002)

Mainsail, with battens and Sunbrella sail cover
150% Genoa, with roller furling (including line) and sheets (has Sunbrella solar-protection edge)
Working jib, with sheets (may be used as a storm sail)
7 cabin cushions
3 cockpit cushions
Cabin curtains/rods
Red carpet (older)
2 deep-draw West Marine 12-volt batteries, new Labor Day weekend, 2001
VHF Radio (ship to shore) and fiberglass antenna, works fine
Ship’s bell and bracket
Winch handle
Reefing handle (for rotating the boom)
Tiller handle with cover
Manual bilge pump
Automatic (12-volt) bilge pump
Galley sink
Galley water pump (manual)
Alcohol stove, on gimbals
Approximately 3 quarts of alcohol in separate container
Icebox with shelf and styrofoam cooler
Enclosed head with sink and water pump (manual)
110 volt circuit-breakered electric system, with shore cable, cabin lights, outlets, etc.
12-volt system, cabin lights, etc., all lights work except the floodlights which are designed to shine down on the deck.
Cockpit awning (light nylon with poles, can go under the boom), great for those hot days when you hit the ‘doldrums,” but not good in stiff wind.
Portable swim ladder
Anchor (Danforth-type) and rode
Boat hook
6 fenders
3 fire extinguishers
1 ignition key (screwdriver)! The previous owner was right, the location is perfect to break the key off, so we use (as he did) a screwdriver to rotate the cylinder, which works fine.
AM/FM radio with two speakers (FM works poorly, perhaps because of a poor ground plane in a fiberglass boat). AM works reasonably well, once you hit the button for AM, then scroll or seek (try 740 AM, Toronto Oldies station)
Knot meter (works about 90% of the time), however, sometimes it takes a good wave to start the small propeller spinning). It reads just slightly fast, compared to chart readings or GPS
Depth meter (works well when sailing, however, gets interference with the engine running), has red light for setting depth warning
Bilge blower, not connected
Spot light, works, but the socket needs either re-wiring or repair
Dock lines (lots of them)
12-volt fan in cabin (not connected)
Air horns (pressurized cans)
12-volt wet/dry vacuum
110-volt Dirt Devil vacuum cleaner
Rubber 3-person dinghy (patched)
2 oars for above
2 adult life jackets
Automatic tiller and all electrical connections, etc. (needs repair or replacement)
Atomic Four, four-cylinder gasoline in-board engine (starts great, runs strong)
Page 2 of 2
Columbia List

Container of spare parts for the engine, etc. (Spare water pump impeller, coil, belts, screws, propeller (cracked but serviceable), and much more
Plywood filler and foam for V-berth (makes sleeping much more comfortable for two people)
3 pillows (older) in V-berth
Water filter, with spare filter, under galley sink (may need a new O-Ring, as it leaks slightly)
Flare gun, with up-to-date flares, meeting USG regulations
Hand-held flare, up-to-date, meeting USG regulations
Older hand-held flares, badly outdated (Use last!)(Some people dispose of them, however, my feeling is that the last one, outdated or not, might be the one someone sees!)
Distress Flag
Mainsail halyard
Jib halyard
Topping lift halyard
Main sheet
Spare blocks
Spare brass key and hardened sets crew (connects engine to propeller shaft)
Spare new Stuffing Box (seals water out of the engine compartment as shaft rotates)
9-volt smoke alarm
Padlock and 1 key
Storage closet with hanger rod
Spare sail-slides, set screws for stanchions, etc.
Spare bulbs for navigation lights and cabin lights
Throwable life preserver (horseshoe-shaped) with rack
“Key” for opening the holding tank and fuel covers
Steel cradle, with 4 adjustable screw jacks and new double plywood carpeted pads
Three 9’ x 12’ plastic tarps and miscellaneous lines holding them on (for winter covers)

Kathleen and Roland O’Brien
12/02



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Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Visit roland693's homepage! Find more posts by this user  
roland693
Junior Member

Registered: January 2004
Location: aboard 41 Coronado
Posts: 7
Review Date: Wed December 4, 2002 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

28-foot Columbia, S/N 425

List of items which go with the boat (2002)

Mainsail, with battens and Sunbrella sail cover
150% Genoa, with roller furling (including line) and sheets (has Sunbrella solar-protection edge)
Working jib, with sheets (may be used as a storm sail)
7 cabin cushions
3 cockpit cushions
Cabin curtains/rods
Red carpet (older)
2 deep-draw West Marine 12-volt batteries, new Labor Day weekend, 2001
VHF Radio (ship to shore) and fiberglass antenna, works fine
Ship’s bell and bracket
Winch handle
Reefing handle (for rotating the boom)
Tiller handle with cover
Manual bilge pump
Automatic (12-volt) bilge pump
Galley sink
Galley water pump (manual)
Alcohol stove, on gimbals
Approximately 3 quarts of alcohol in separate container
Icebox with shelf and styrofoam cooler
Enclosed head with sink and water pump (manual)
110 volt circuit-breakered electric system, with shore cable, cabin lights, outlets, etc.
12-volt system, cabin lights, etc., all lights work except the floodlights which are designed to shine down on the deck.
Cockpit awning (light nylon with poles, can go under the boom), great for those hot days when you hit the ‘doldrums,” but not good in stiff wind.
Portable swim ladder
Anchor (Danforth-type) and rode
Boat hook
6 fenders
3 fire extinguishers
1 ignition key (screwdriver)! The previous owner was right, the location is perfect to break the key off, so we use (as he did) a screwdriver to rotate the cylinder, which works fine.
AM/FM radio with two speakers (FM works poorly, perhaps because of a poor ground plane in a fiberglass boat). AM works reasonably well, once you hit the button for AM, then scroll or seek (try 740 AM, Toronto Oldies station)
Knot meter (works about 90% of the time), however, sometimes it takes a good wave to start the small propeller spinning). It reads just slightly fast, compared to chart readings or GPS
Depth meter (works well when sailing, however, gets interference with the engine running), has red light for setting depth warning
Bilge blower, not connected
Spot light, works, but the socket needs either re-wiring or repair
Dock lines (lots of them)
12-volt fan in cabin (not connected)
Air horns (pressurized cans)
12-volt wet/dry vacuum
110-volt Dirt Devil vacuum cleaner
Rubber 3-person dinghy (patched)
2 oars for above
2 adult life jackets
Automatic tiller and all electrical connections, etc. (needs repair or replacement)
Atomic Four, four-cylinder gasoline in-board engine (starts great, runs strong)
Page 2 of 2
Columbia List

Container of spare parts for the engine, etc. (Spare water pump impeller, coil, belts, screws, propeller (cracked but serviceable), and much more
Plywood filler and foam for V-berth (makes sleeping much more comfortable for two people)
3 pillows (older) in V-berth
Water filter, with spare filter, under galley sink (may need a new O-Ring, as it leaks slightly)
Flare gun, with up-to-date flares, meeting USG regulations
Hand-held flare, up-to-date, meeting USG regulations
Older hand-held flares, badly outdated (Use last!)(Some people dispose of them, however, my feeling is that the last one, outdated or not, might be the one someone sees!)
Distress Flag
Mainsail halyard
Jib halyard
Topping lift halyard
Main sheet
Spare blocks
Spare brass key and hardened sets crew (connects engine to propeller shaft)
Spare new Stuffing Box (seals water out of the engine compartment as shaft rotates)
9-volt smoke alarm
Padlock and 1 key
Storage closet with hanger rod
Spare sail-slides, set screws for stanchions, etc.
Spare bulbs for navigation lights and cabin lights
Throwable life preserver (horseshoe-shaped) with rack
“Key” for opening the holding tank and fuel covers
Steel cradle, with 4 adjustable screw jacks and new double plywood carpeted pads
Three 9’ x 12’ plastic tarps and miscellaneous lines holding them on (for winter covers)

Kathleen and Roland O’Brien
12/02



This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Visit roland693's homepage! Find more posts by this user  


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