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Home » Sailnet Boat Reviews » E - Boats starting with 'E' » Ericson
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Ericson 26
Reviews Views Date of last review
6 4755 Fri April 7, 2000
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Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
100% of reviewers None indicated None indicated












Description: Ericson 26
Keywords: Ericson 26
 


Author
administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Wed September 25, 1996 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

My Ericson 26 has a one cyl. diesel and tiller steering.
It has a comfortable cockpit, roller furling and all lines lead aft.
It has a head with holding tank, alcohol stove, ice box and a tiny hanging locker.
The V berth, quarter birth, setee and slide out setee will sleep 6 adults.

Ericson Yachts are now produced by:

Pacific Seacraft Corp.
1301 E. Orangethorpe Ave.
Fullerton, CA 92831
fax: 714-879-5454

They have some parts such as rubrail, rudders and a few other items. They will be happy to refer to "off-the-shelf" suppliers when they are available.

They have published a newsletter called the "Ericson Burgee" periodically.

There are a few rendezvous each year: Maine, Block Island, and Seattle/Puget sound. Let them know where you are and they'll try and direct you.

It's a great boat . It's an evolution of the Ericson 25+.


LOA 25'9",
LWL 21'11",
BEAM 9'3",
DRAFT 4'11" (deep), or 3'11" other,
DISPLACEMENT 5250 lbs,
BALLAST 2250,
ENGINE: 10 hp diesel, (per book) mine is 6.5hp
FUEL 15 gal,
WATER 18 gal,
Fractional rig total sail area 325 sq feet,
100% foretriangle 160 sq ft, Main 165 sq ft.
Rig measurements: I 30.5 ft, P 31.5 ft, E 10.5 ft, J 10.5 ft
Ice box 5 cu ft.
Designer: Bruce King
construction, Tri-axial Force Grid,
10 year hull warranty,





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administrator

Administrator

Registered: January 2000
Location: maryland
Posts: 1888
Review Date: Tue October 13, 1998 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:









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sofalyr
Junior Member

Registered: April 2000
Review Date: Fri April 7, 2000 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Purchased in 1988. Model is 26-3 Excellent performer in light to heavy winds, 130% genoa, points very high. Very high quality construction. Handles well for single handing. Only critisism is small head, difficult to close door for 6 footer. 5'11" head room. Hand holds in salon. Feels very safe. Very stiff, but with very light tiller. Highly recommend!
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Review Date: Tue December 5, 2000 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

I have owned this boat since June 2000. I have past sailing experience on a Catalina 30 and a Catalina 27, Venture 23. This boat is tender to about 9 degrees, but it stiffens up at that degree of heel. The main needs to be reefed at about 15 knts. and at 20 knts. the jib should be partially furled. The boat will feel very responsive with the tiller and reacts very quickly to minor tiller changes. I have been able to get the boat to point as high as 85 degrees into the wind with my 130% Genoa. The cockpit is of good size, but can feel crowded with more that four adults, especially when working the sails. I considered installing a steering wheel, but have now decided to leave that idea behind. The cockpit would be too crowded and the cost wouldn't justified, when the money coud be spent on more important upgrades. I plan on installing a dodger and Raytheon Autohelm. The orgional gages still work, they are the circular Signets, with digital readout. I will be sending the depth finder to the factory to be refirbished, as it has somehow gotten mold inside the readout. I have the 4'11" draft w/ fin keel. The rig is fractional w/a slight fixed rake to aft. This gives me just the right amount of weather helm.

The interior is very roomy and feels like a 28+. The cushions are origional and have held up very well. I have and Origo 4000 alcohol two burner stove, that works very well and burns clean. The only upgrade to the ineterior was the P.O. installed a pressurized water system. This beats pumping by hand or foot when doing dishes. The head is a little short on leg room when seated on the toilet, but it works very well. I have had four adults and two children spend two nights and three days on this boat and we still liked each other at the end of the trip.

I have been very pleased with this boat. I chose this boat after looking at over 60+ others. I even passed up several 30+ footers in choosing this boat. I emmediately fell in love with this boat after looking at it's lines and inspecting the fit and finish. The hull alone seemed to be more solid and the draft is extremely deep for this size boat. In five to six years I plan on upgrading to a 30+ Ericson, possibely one of the rare Ericson 31 Independences as Gylnn Judson (Ericson List) owns. My parents have owned several sailboats and there oppinion is that an Ericon is considered one of the Cadilacs of boats.

On my way to my winter dry storgae I encountered 35+ winds out of the south. The boat handled the 6 to 7 foot waves OK, but the 10hp Universal IB didn't push the boat very well into the wind. The trip which usually took five hours, took me nine hours. At times my knotmeter indicated 0 knts., which I confirmed with my GPS. This would happen when I hit a set of steep waves, causing the boat to stall out. All in all the boat did fine, although I got very wet without a dodger.

John Young
E26
"OUTNUMBERED"
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Review Date: Tue September 4, 2001 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

Mike McCabe's review summarizes the specs very well.

My '85 was bought in L.A., CA, in '91 & I moved it to a KS lake. I stripped all old bottom paint from the hull in spring '92 prior to repainting and the bottom had no blisters or previous repairs (despite being salt-water slipped 6 years). This model had three keel options: one was shallower but longer fore & aft; there was a later shoal draft wing keel; and there was the 5' draft fin keel I had. There may be differences in equipment, hardware, etc., but I saw little between the molded portions of the earlier 25+ and my 26 except there's a longer coach roof over the vee-berth (which is helpful) and the forward hatch does have a better placement for ventilation, & people (or sails, etc.) passing through.

The Ericson is a really nice, stable boat with a big boat feel about it. I've sailed it reefed in several storms of > 40mph winds; it handled well, and felt very safe & secure. Single handing was easily done (with a Forespar hiking stick -- for tiller control moving about, not hiking).

"Practical Sailor" wrote a favorable review of the 25+ and it's also applicable to the 26 -- they said the 25+ was comparable to a typically larger boat. The interior layout appears to be a deliberately scaled-down version of the 28+; after a bit, some of the features begin feeling more dimunitively cute than fully functional (e.g., the hanging locker; storage in the head, etc.).

Two interiors were available -- one had a lot of carpeting on the surfaces & typically an OB; another (like mine) was quite rich in teak paneling -- much of it solid!--& usually diesel power. The teak was initially stunning but needs frequent oil & rubbing to look its best; the carpeting might be easier for long-term living-with. My 10 hp Westerbeke diesel was utterly reliable but certainly wouldn't drive the boat to hull speed against a stiff wind with the stock 2 blade prop; the 26 didn't back badly but the tiller needed a firm arm while reversing. Compared to others, engine access was good.

While the specs say "sleeps 6," this boat becomes very crowded with 4 people for very long.

The "pros" on the 26 are good design; quality construction, & quality of most fittings, interior, furnishings; sailing ability & looks.

The "cons" are piddly things--maybe marketing decisions?-- that can be corrected, alleviated, or tolerably endured. Why design a boat of this size to "sleep 6?"--space could've been utilized so much better if designed to sleep 2 or 3. Not as much attention was put on adequate storage as desireable. The bilge is very shallow (why not have a DEEP bilge/sump?); as it is, when heeled, water runs under the bottom of the molded storage areas under the cabin seats. Storage pans molded into the berths keep things in them dry but having to use them also severely limits storage volume. The "Tri-axial force grid" may contribute to sturdiness but the molded FG hull liner also makes it harder to get at fittings behind/under it, or use that area for maximum storage

The 26 could use more ventilation, e.g., replacing the stock small forward side lights/windows with small opening Lewmars as on the 28+, maybe ventilation in the hatch boards, maybe putting opening ports into the existing larger side lights, etc.


If cruising alot, I'd refit my engine gauges/controls much higher, maybe to port of the companionway. Since they're located about ankle height off the bottom of the cockpit, they're hard to read & impossible to regularly monitor for those with normal human necks. The cockpit drains are topped by very restrictive strainers -- one winter on the cradle, mine clogged with a few blown leaves; when the snow melted, the engine panel acted as the emergency drain through which water escaped into the bilge. My fuel tank had crud in it & I wanted to remove & clean it; my yard said it couldn't be done but it DOES just barely come out through the port cockpit seat.

Down below, the vinyl overhead lining is attractive and functional; it makes for convenient storage for charts and easy changes in some wiring, etc. However, check & lubricate the metal zippers. If you're buying, check EVERY one of them their full length -- removing, repairing, reinstalling the lining may not be cheap. The stool in the head needs to be bolted as far to outboard as possible so the knees of the person on it won't block closing the door of the head. The original deckplates (fuel/ waste/water) are thin SS metal and easily get cross threaded; I replaced mine with Scandviks.

My greatest frustration was in adequately tuning the rig. I'm from a background racing OD dinghies and need a boat to go to windward well. The old sails were blown so I bought new Norths and a Harken RF. (Adjusting RF jibstay length isn't easy; it would've been MUCH easier to tune it first without the RF but the regular jib was blown.) I spent a year trying to get the boat to tack better than 100 degrees but that was the best it would do. A guy at North gave many hours consultation & I tried everything -- adjusting the mast butt forward & back as much as the plate allowed, various rakes, etc., nothing helped. The North guy finally said, "look, it's a cruising boat, not a racer; cruising boats won't point as high." Finally, I pulled the mast & relocated the mast butt plate/tabernacle about 1" farther aft of its factory position, caulked, restepped, & then retuned the mast and it paid off. At its best, the 26 would then beat about 80-85 degrees between tacks. (My genoa was a 150 and furling it to 135 took a little off that; furling still more took even more.) The boat felt much better; it felt like it was swimming, like an eager-to-be-let-go fish. It's worth being persistent on the tuning -- the factory settings may not always be best.

All in all, my 26 was a lovely boat. It wasn't great in light wind but it did well in other ranges. (I used to dream of doing an aggressive interior remodeling & modification, and turning it into a magnificent cruiser for 2 and sailing the Caribbean, but documenting it was about as far as I got.) My job and available time changed and at that time I could no longer sail so it rested on its cradle its last two years with me; it sold rapidly in 1997. Sweet boat ; hope you enjoy yours

[The 1998 PHRF book lists the Ericson 26 as about 234 and the Ericson 26-2 around 213; I've no idea what distinguishes between a "1" and a "2" model; you could ask the PHRF or USSA. There's also a 1998 Portsmouth rating (D-PN = 93.9) in parentheses, indicating there is not sufficent data for a reliable rating.]

rev. 2-22-01

I've also written Owners Reviews of the Pearson Ensign, the S2 6.9, and S2 6.7
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Review Date: Sun March 13, 2005 Would you recommend the product? Yes | Price you paid?: None indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros:
Cons:

We bought our Ericson 26 in February of 2002 in Victoria, British Columbia. She had been neglected for some time, and was pretty damp inside, which meant that the upholstery needed replacing and the woodwork needed refinishing.

We intalled a new set of UK sails (main, furling tape-drive 150 genoa, spinnaker), as well as a MaxProp 2-bladed feathering prop.

A previous owner had fitted her with a Universal M3-20 diesel, and installed a wheel which is great for cruising, but which can be replaced with a tiller (for racing) in 40 minutes.

The end result is a very pretty boat that my wife and I spend endless hours on. It sails very well, especially in winds over 5 knots. I find it points high while maintaining good speed. (I installed a backstay adjuster, which seems to make a big difference in upwind performance over a range of wind conditions.)

On reaches, the boat seems to develop weather helm quickly. I haven't tried reefing the main in reaching conditions yet, but it may be the solution to the problem.

The boat's downwind performance under spinnaker is OK, but not especially spectacular. On the other hand, it is very stable in big winds (something my wife appreciates). We have yet to get a leeward rail buried, and though we've had a couple of "round-ups", we have yet to have a full-blown broach. The boat is a dry and comfortable sailer. The engine/prop combination works really well. The boat can keep moving in the heavy stuff, and has outstanding reversing capabilities.

"Deryn Mor" has won its fair share of races, and sails easily to its PHRF-NW handicap of 231.

We are very pleased with its overall performance, comfort, and quality. A lot of boat in a small package.
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