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Old 03-22-2013
limpyweta limpyweta is offline
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Re: British Columbia wilderness, sometime in next 3 years, any exp

Well, from what this has provoked from me, I guess this is something that's not really efficient to learn more about with just a forum. It's indeed good to know these sailors still exist.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
I have windjammed without an engine of any kind for several years on this coast. Takes a long time to get anywhere, so you best have indefinite plans
For some people, 14 days is indefinite, or "endless", for others, 3 months to a year is definite, or not a "long time".
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
Expect to spend weeks in extremely doubtful anchorages, waiting for wind
Just my thoughts, not trying to pick your brain, but, like my other comments here, for myself and others not to be that simply discouraged from going and trying for themselves:
Where and when would this happen? How would one get into the situation of being in an extremely doubtful anchorage? How much wind is wind for the boat? What is the boat, and how does she and her sailors manage in light winds and sporadic calms? How do you look for a good anchorage? How may you test if the anchor is dragging? How do you anchor? What kind of anchors are they? How heavy are the anchors? What kind of rode? How much rode? How much and what kind of chain? What about stern and bow ties? What about a mushroom? Can one use a 3rd of a knot of current with a yuloh, or 2 sculling oars with a crew of 2, to get where some local winds or more favorable current are happening? When and where would an anchorage be doubtful in a calm? Could the weather be predicted in a way for someone to be on anchor watch, or prepared, if the winds and waves would otherwise pick up faster than the boat could avoid trouble (I've also been in this kinda situation, the bow tied to kelp, ready to get blown ashore, story for another time)? Is there a way crew could safely find new anchorage at night if the wind does pick up sometimes? What would this do to sleeping times?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Len View Post
Also many commercial fishers and crawling with sport fishers. They all have engines now. Probably a good reason for that. Back in the day,before I was a kid ,folks did sail/row small dorys on the coast but most took a tow from the company packer.
There are many good reasons for them to have an engine, and a backup engine, or great maintenance and understanding of the thing with oars. There are times when it is not fun at all, and mentally and physically exhausting. My reasons and the reasons from other engineless sailors are on the blog.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Len View Post
One problem that I've not found an answer for is 'How to get ashore with all the bears on the beach and even worse "how to get to the beached dinghy to return to mother ship". And then there's cougars
Again, sailors can stay on the boat if they want. From Bear Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance, each year there are millions of times in which each bear species is close to people and no threat or injury results, and in North America in the 90's, bears killed 29 people, Grizzlies 18, black bears 11. From the BC Ministry of Environment: "In the past 100 years, a total of five people have been killed by cougar attacks in B.C. (in comparison, bees kill upwards of three Canadians every year). During the same period, there were 29 non-fatal attacks in British Columbia - 20 of which occurred on Vancouver Island. The vast majority of these attacks were on children under the age of 16." I know little of such encounters, but hope to learn more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Len View Post
...Also many commercial fishers and crawling with sport fishers. They all have engines now. Probably a good reason for that. Back in the day,before I was a kid ,folks did sail/row small dorys on the coast but most took a tow from the company packer.
There are many good reasons for *them* to have an engine, and a backup engine, or great maintenance and understanding of the thing with oars. There are times when pure sailing is not fun at all, and mentally and physically exhausting. My strange reasons and the reasons from other engineless sailors are on the blog.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Len View Post
Getting up the Salish Sea to Surge Narrows is easy but going beyond asks for a bit of talent. If no engine think swampscot or Drascomb lugger, many seasons of learning curvs and longer anchor rodes than you've got.
What would a sailor learn in a season? What are the anchoring circumstances and the planning that got one into the situation where there probably isn't enough rode?
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