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Old 03-31-2013
joebeach joebeach is offline
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Re: Start Up Planning and Advice

Quote:
Originally Posted by davecook03 View Post
My wife and I will be purchasing our first sailboat within the next five years....
I need some direction in understanding what boats (with practice) would eventually allow us to sail from the US to Bermuda, Brazil, and eventually Europe. What length of boat should we look at? What is to short or to long for cross Atlantic travel?....

I have seen something about 'Class A' boats, but I cannot find a true listing of them....

We really like this boat. It seams laid out well and seems to have what we are looking for. Any help please? Websites we should look at?

2001 Hunter 460 2001 Hunter 460 sailboat for sale in Florida
There are others far more qualified than I who will chime in, as I am still in the process of researching my first sailboat. FWIW, from what I've been able to learn to date, it looks as if that Hunter 460 you've linked to is a very comfortable and well-equipped coastal cruiser that is also Bahamas and perhaps Gulf/Caribbean (near-offshore) capable.

Some of those very comforts (large openings for light an ventilation, open interior, sugar scoop stern, dinghy on davits, etc.) might present problems in an Atlantic crossing, however. Sailing near the coast, and even shooting from Florida over to the Bahamas, etc., involves making relatively short hops that enable you to pick favorable weather windows to sail, and also to wait out bad weather in safe anchorages as is needed. Crossing the open ocean (at 7-8 knots) means that the boat and crew should be capable of handling and surviving any storm or rogue wave that might occur out there - beyond the scope of the latest weather report in port, and days away from any potential rescue. I'd imagine that if you are lucky with the weather and seas the Hunter 460 could get you over to the Med, but if you are not so lucky, you are literally risking the lives of captain and crew.

So, are you feeling lucky? Regardless, it's a beautiful boat, and I wish you the best in your cruising ventures to come.

As a minor side note - with a 5.5 foot wing keel draft you may be restricted somewhat in sailing in shallower waters such as in much of the Bahamas, the Keys, the Chesapeake, etc.
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