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Old 01-04-2007
EscapadeCaliber40LRC EscapadeCaliber40LRC is offline
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Magnus, If you or Greg are still interested, I can give you my perspective on owning a used 40 LRC. I don't have much experience with other boats to compare it with, but I love this boat!

I've own it for 3 plus years. Its a 1995 vintage. It was set up by experienced sailors planning a world cruise back in the mid 1990s. They covered the Pacific from Alaska down to Mexico and across to NZ and Oz before medical issues caused them to sell the boat. It came to me with a hard dodger and plastic enclosures, all lines pulled aft into the cockpit. Both the genoa and staysail are on furlers. It came with 224 watts of solar and a charge controller, a Link 2000R and the Heart inverter/charger. 540 amps of house gels. A 40 gallon hot water tank which is heated on shore power as well as by the Yanmar. A windless, with a Delta on 250 foot of chain, a 44 Bruce and a Fortress FX37 as backup anchors. An excellent hydraulic/electronic autopilot plus some Micom SSB and various VHF radios and a Spectra 8 gal/hour watermaker. The Yanmar has a high amperage charging Balmar alternator. The engine also was set up with an electric air bleed device which makes getting air out of the gas lines a snap.

In NZ they had a refit done that included a major upgrade to internal cabinetry. Other Caliber owners always "oh and ah" over this customized feature which put storage doors on all the shelves in the salon area and replaced that ridiculous desk in the forward berth with a nice set of two drawers and a third storage door at foot level, as well as more storage drawers in the forward berth. It also has a remarkable adjustable Davits arch made of 3 inch stainless that is an eyecatcher as well. The tankage is remarkable. I left Maimi with a full load of diesel and one jerry jug on deck. I never bothered with buying fuel again until I reached the east coast of Puerto Rico (1100 upwind miles and several months later). During the course of that trip, cruising buddies were constantly jerry jugging and filtering diesel at various stops along the way. I missed out on that camraderie development. I do most of the sailing activities like a single hander because the admiral onboard tells me that this is my dream not hers, and since she out ranks me ...

I agree that the nav station is quite inconvienent. I happen to do most of my navigating in the cockpit. I have set up a split input for a color Garmin, one hookup in front of the wheel. and one at the nav station. When clear surface space is needed, we fold out the salon table to its full width, and I can spread charts out on that nicely.

Pointing into the wind is tough. This is not a race boat but it tacks nicely.
I do low speed turns, by first furling the genny then coming about. I have found this to be the easiest way to change tack. While heading upwind this past year. I have relied heavily on the Yanmar for must of the upwind migration. It seems to run fine. Keeping the maxprop clean of growth has also helped.

Things I have added in the past year or two include a portable genset, a wind generator, the Garmin and a backup, both bought on Ebay, a replacement of all the batteries both house and starters, and a spinnaker for some future down wind sailing I hope to do. Also a replacement of the Raytheon radar which turned out to be false alarm, The original worked fine after I removed it and hooked it up on a bench so I now have a spare oh well. I also bought a forth anchor, a Danforth to be used for storm settings. I experienced several hurricanes while based in a slip in South Florida now the boat is ready to set out 4 good anchors in the nearest mangrove.

The only thing I am considering adding now is a bowthruster. This topic seems to generate lots of passionate views in others, I happen to think it would be a nice to have tool when approaching unfamiliar docks as I continue in my migration.
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