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Old 05-29-2013
anthemj24 anthemj24 is offline
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Re: Cheap Classic Plastic smokes the fleet in 2013 Down the Bay Race

Quote:
Originally Posted by jameswilson29 View Post
O.K., how about this one: Apparently, you could still buy a Hobie 33 in 2003 for $55,000 : Torresen Sailing and Boating News » Blog Archive » One Design Comeback Hobie 33

At about the same time, I believe the J/105 (one of the least expensive of the newer Asym sportboats) was in the $150-200,000 range.

That is exactly my point.

Where are the new, production raceboats like the old Santa Cruz 27, J/27, Olson 30, and Hobie 33?

These were superfast for their day, relatively spartan, low tech boats for the average (did-well-financially) Joe to race: regular hand-laid fiberglass hull, regular aluminum single spreader rig, simple layout, simple gear, and regular lead keel.

Now you have to buy a scrimp, vacumn-bagged epoxy hull with a carbon fiber mast, a carbon fiber foil, and a more complicated, expensive rig and gear, not to mention electronics. The entry costs are much greater now. And for what? An incremental speed gain in light air?

The relatively, inexpensive new speedsters don't exist anymore. That fact that those boats are still competitive says something about where modern race design has gone.
The Flying Tiger 10 is pretty much now what the Hobie 33 was then. It is very fast and very affordable, and they just don't sell a ton of them. The cost of campaigning a boat in the 35ft range is very high regardless of the initial price. Plus the logistics are crazy. I had a half baked idea to do more racing and get a sport boat I could trailer around, once I started adding up the costs in time, money, and grey hair, I bagged the whole idea. The price of the boat was the last thing on my mind, instead it was the hotels, gas for the tow vehicle, new sails each year, restaurant bills, and trying to get 5 people to commit to a full schedule given the realities of today's work schedules. The guys who can take that time off, or pay people to put a campaign together for them, pay for all the maintenance, crew, and other expenses, are not going to skimp on the initial price.
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