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Old 01-20-2007
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JagsBch JagsBch is offline
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Here is my metareasoning behind this plan:
As far as meeting needs in life there are two lines of thinking: 1) How do I get more and 2) How can I do with less.
We are taking route 2, with the idea that drastically reducing our global footprint is a responsible, and satisfying way of approaching life...
if we find we need more down the road, then we'll get more. Until then, we won't worry about it.

Now there is a noble concept, being satisfied, while making more out of less. That is exactly what I am talking about~!!

Love not sleep, lest thou come to poverty; open thine eyes, [and] thou shalt be satisfied with bread. Pro 20:13

The way I see it doc, is that you have 15K to throw down on a boat; talk about a lot of bread, and a huge responsibility to boot. Practicality ought to be priority one, blue water boat could actual be a residual of having a practical living arrangement. There are plenty of boats that are already rigged for Blue Water on the market, I was actually looking at this one I made a $7,000 offer and it was accepted.


http://yachtworld.com/core/listing/p...oat_id=1374541

Heck with another 5K this boat could be a steal indeed.

Point is to be diligent in your search, don't assume that a 30' will be easier to manage than a 33 or even a 34 for that matter, as dog pointed out that is just not the case. My point is that I just don't see your wife and infant taking showers at school with you.

Speaking from my own personal experience, I was surprise to learn how high a premium that the commodity of privacy is for a woman. As the man, she trusts you to take "good" care of here and the baby. I just don’t see her packing up the baby in the rain to go and take a shower together as being practical or well thought out. Paying 25 dollars more a month for 3 extra feet when it is going to be giving you one quarter more living space is a priceless no brainer IMO.

The footprint of 3 more feet could indeed make a better impact on a global level, considering it may alleviate just that much more undue stress from the level our society possess; the difference in the quality and satisfaction level of your family’s existence will make the world a better place. Talk about going from the outhouse to the penthouse~!!

The way I see it 3 to 4 more feet could be the difference of green to red on the satisfaction spectrum. You sir are about to navigate to a new conscious plateau, make sure that your family as well as yourself are comfortable as possible.

You have enough money for all three of you guys to be absolutely comfortable, or absolutely miserable. I just want to take this opportunity to expand your horizon on that logic. More with less can be a good thing.

If I where you, what I would do is look for boats in the 33'-35' range with the asking price of 15-25K and making them offers based your budget constraints. Reach for the skies and you will be shocked at what you can pluck out of it this time of year. You will be shocked at what people will settle for, remeber they toocan be dreaming with their asking price...

If you’re going to dream, dream big. Being a Doc, I am sure you are well aware of the expression and an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, I doubt you will say you need a smaller boat with a 34 footer, and what position will you be in to get a bigger boat after you spend your 15K?

People want to get the money they invest in their boats, but fact of the matter is, there are just to many boats on the market to make that reality so. Know and understand that. Point is people find themselves buying boats and dumping a ton of money into them, only to find themselves selling the boat for less than their original purchase price. In general, the pleasure in sailing comes from investing the money into boats not from trying to flip and getting it back out them.

For instance, I was at breakfast this morning and someone saw me looking at a sailboat trader and offered to give me his 40’ boat. I am serious, it was costing him 400+ dollars a month in storage, don;t underestimate a persons desperate desire to get rid of their boats... Now thinking about it, the man in the restraunt would have probably paid me to take his boat.

A man in NC wanted to sell me a project boat for 10K a boat mind you that needed 25K’s worth of work. Point is you can find boats that people want to get rid of for various reasons, I suggest you find a boat where the owners already went through the trouble bringing it up to speed so to speak @ a fraction of what they spent to get the boat there, there are too many of those available to pass up.

Sailboats I have learned are can be an enigmanolamy. A 25’ boat can be harder to sail than a 35’? A boat you bought for 20K and spent 25K refurbishing could wind up being sold for 14K not even a year after completing the refurbishing? Deals of a lifetime come by every other month? WHAT THE WHAT THE WHAT? Don’t set yourself up for regret; Carpe Diem. Seek and you shall find…

First lesson in sailing 101 is not to set yourself up for worries... Consider yourself on land about to take a voyage to the great blue wonder, You don't want to wait till you get out there to realize that your boat is not big enough... Hello~!!

You don't want to wait till your money is spent to realize that your boat is not comfortable enough to live on. There is a difference between being comfortable with something and being able to tolerate something. The last thing you want to be forced to do with your new home that you will more than likely be stuck in is having to tolerate it. As if there is not enough in the world we are already forced to tolerate.

The way I see it, your home is an extension of your conscious mind, make sure there is room for every one to copacatically exist. There will be plenty of things to worry about with having to set yourself up for it.

I don't see another big chunk of money coming my way anytime in the near future, so I am doing everything in my power to make sure I make the most of it. It is easier to make more space with less money. Less is more, now the only question you have to answer is what is more? Space or the headache of not having enough of it?
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