SailNet Community - View Single Post - Pros and cons of steel sailboats
View Single Post
  #276  
Old 07-24-2013
MastUndSchotbruch MastUndSchotbruch is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 477
Thanks: 18
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Rep Power: 5
MastUndSchotbruch is on a distinguished road
Re: Pros and cons of steel sailboats

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobperry View Post
Mast:
When I designed the Norseman they asked for basically the same kind of boat as I had design for the Lafitte group, the Lafitte 44. This meant a flush deck forward. No problem. OK, one small problem, headroom under the flush deck. I did not want copious freeboard. I designed a bubble to be superimposed upon the nornam deck camber forward of the short cabin trunk. This bubble, something I had seen oin older C&C designs, was effective but I was keen on the profile of it, a bit nebulous. So I extended two "prongs forward from the edges of the cabin trunk, that were tapered and high enough to hide the profile of the bubble. Somebody called these prongs "pickle forks". Maybe it was me. I dont recall. I searched my pic files but I do not have a digitized pic of a Norseman. I'm one of the clever chaps on this forum can come up with one.

I used the volume in the prongs for line bins and to form the boxes for Dorade vents in the forward end of the pickle fork. Unfortunately the volume in the end of the fork was inadequate and they did not work well. My bad.

Al Mason showed up at my ofice one day unannounced. I was honored. He had some questions about what I provided to the builders in Taiwan to guide them through the building of a deck plug. I showed him several of my deck lines drawings. While basking in the glow of having Al Mason ask me for advice I said I had a question for him. I wanted to know how much volume to put in a Dorade box. I knew he had worked at S&S and they don't guess at S&S, I thought. Al said, "Just draw it so it looks right. Then make it twice that big." Those were his exact words.

Al died about six months later.
Thank you, Bob.