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Old 09-10-2013
JonEisberg JonEisberg is offline
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Quote:
Originally Posted by AKscooter View Post
Do I need to know where I am to 10 meters.....no really...no....I do need a decent set of charts, a compass, good anchor with plenty of chain, coffee....I really need coffee.....
Actually, if you are attempting to cut costs, you DO need a GPS that will pinpoint your position exactly, and do your navigating relying primarily on electronic charts...

One of the thing that jumped out at me from those folks in Donna's link, was that for a couple averaging over $50K per year in costs, how miniscule was their annual cost for charts and guides... They're obviously relying primarily on e-charts. The cost of carrying "a decent set of (paper) charts" for a circumnavigation today has become astronomical, and those wishing to do their voyaging/navigating 'the old-fashioned way' are gonna pay for it now, bigtime...

The days of doing anything other than a non-stop circumnavigation on the cheap are gone, the fixed costs of fees for entry into various countries have skyrocketed in recent years, they remain basically the same whether you're sailing a 20' Flicka or an 80' Oyster, and will only continue to increase... If one really wants to go places, there's just no getting around many of those costs...

Quote:

When actual costs exceeded expectations, the root was repair and maintenance. In a few cases, marina fees in some parts of the world were the reason. “Docking fees have soared in the past few years, and services have become more expensive,” said Barry Esrig, the owner of a Baltic 51, Lady E. “Croatia often charges for anchoring, while Turkey now requires an agent to clear in and out.” Jim Patek of Let’s Go!, an Ovni 435, offered a similar sentiment. “On my latest voyage, I observed right away that the day of the shoestring cruiser is gone,” he said. “In some of the places where we used to anchor, one must now use docking or mooring facilities.”

Cap’n Fatty Goodlander found that on his second circumnavigation aboard his boat, Wild Card, a Hughes 38, costs were occasionally higher than expected due to several factors. “Clearing-in and -out costs are now skyrocketing,” he said.

Jimmy Cornell: What it Costs to Cruise | Cruising World
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