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Old 09-19-2013
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Re: This curious nautical language

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
Halliard more commonly spelt Halyard today. I'd never seen the Halliard spelling before this.
Since the original term was "haul-yard" - because, on a square-rigger, it's the rope you use to actually haul the yard up, sail attached, once you've got it unfurled and sheeted to your liking - the spelling shift is an odd one indeed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
Blackwall Hitch is still in use it seems.
.. as is the Topsail Hitch, even though neither find much use on a modern yacht.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
Handy Billy is a form of black and tackle.
..and a pump if you're American. Worked by blacks perhaps, TD??


Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
Dandy and/or Jigger is a form of mizzen sail, most commonly seen on yawls.
..and on a great many full-rigged ships, so that one will be around for a while yet. It does tend to dance around a bit when sailing down-wind though, and perhaps that's where the reference to certain types of people came from.
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Last edited by Classic30; 09-19-2013 at 02:25 AM.
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