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Old 09-27-2013
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Re: Bilge Pump Check Valve Issues on 2013 Beneteau Oceanis 45

Catalina loves to install these things too. Is yours the bronze check valve or the "plastic" check valve?

Here is the ultimate solution if you want one. It isn't the cheapest or the easiest, but it has worked very well for me.

Install a diaphram pump (yours probbly has a centrifigal pump like a Rule or similar). Whale makes a check valve that is a very simply rubber flap instead of the more complicated gate type valve used in the bronze CV's. So install this cheap check valve at the very end of the sucking portion of the hose. This allows you to really pull your bilge dry and at a very low point. Plus, diaphram pumps have more power to push and pull water. However, here's the issue with Diaphram pumps: they do not move nearly as much water as a centrifugal.

SO what I did is I kept my centrifigal (still sitting in the bottom) but put another float switch on it higher than the float switch for the diaphram pump. This float switch also has an alarm (If it goes off, it means I have high water).

You have two options for discharge on the centrifigal pump. One (best way) is to run a whole other overboard. Most boaters don't want to do this. Another (At least in Catalina) is to use the manual pump line.

See, here's the key: You can still use your manual pump on a centrifigal pump due to its design. You cannot (do not) use it on a diaphram pump as you will not be able to suck through the diaphram pump.

Does that make sense? You now have the best of all worlds - two bilge pumps, a check valve and super-sucking diaphram pump, and a high volume centrifugal pump... plus you have an alarm and you retain your ability to use your manual pump without drilling holes and running more tubing in your boat.

Brian
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