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Old 09-28-2013
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Re: Pros and cons of steel sailboats

Quote:
Originally Posted by blt2ski View Post
Dean,

I would agree that many types of material have ways of making a proper item, having also worked in construction. Solid concrete walls in some places are better than block walls, other places, blocks are better. Concrete pavers can be better than solid poured concrete vs asphalt. All products I have worked with in landscapes.

Can say the same for different types of wood for decks, fences etc. At the end of the day...which is best.....yeah right!

I also have not been told how much a steel 8' pram would wiegh either. I asked that a while back. I doubt it would be less than 50 lbs as one can buld an El Toro 0r equal. I could probably use kevlar or carbon and epoxy and build it to less than 25-35 lbs. ALL building materils have plus and minus's to them.

Marty
Agreed.

Almost every book I've read on sailing and cruising states that boats are compromises. Brent seems to think that if you want to cruise or circumnavigate, steel is the way to go while fiberglass is great for the "marina queens". Quite frankly, I think almost all sailors fall in the middle with occasional leanings in each direction. I would think that even circumnavigators spend some well deserved rest at dockside or tucked away in a cove. Looking at posts from new sailors they almost invariably have dreams of long excursions or blue water sailing. And has there ever been a sailor that has remained in colder climes without visiting a tropical destination or vice versa? As long as the owner of the boat is doing with it as they wish and it makes them happy, the boat is serving it's purpose.

I think the material the boat is built out of is one of those compromises that each individual sailor must make depending on their unique needs and requirements.