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Old 10-26-2013
lavidanueva lavidanueva is offline
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Re: 6 Americans, 1 Brit vanish at sea

John Glennie survived 119 days at sea on the overturned Rose Noelle. He was on the East side of New Zealand. His boat went over the same day of the year as the Nina went missing, June 4th. We consult with John frequently. He says, "don't give up".

John lived in the space of a twin bed with 18 inches of headroom along with three other sailors. When one sailor turned over the other three had to turn over with him. The outside man could only stand to be on the outside for about 4 hours. They they had to shift positions. When they ran out of food, they fished. John says if the Nina survived the big storm then the crew is alive. Clearly, the longer they are out there the tougher it gets.

Despite the most thorough search in the history of New Zealand, no wreckage was found. They did an extensive shore line search, as well.

Texas Equusearch is 100% all volunteer. All of the people involved in this search are volunteers. There are expenses, the biggest in hiring private aircraft. We work hard because we can see if John Glennie survived, why this crew can survive.

The last message sent indicated they had shredded their sails on the Nina. They had limited supplies of motor fuel aboard. If you know about the Tasman Sea you know about the reverse circulating currents and how boats get spun around and around. The Scotch Bonnet, abandoned near the last know position of the Nina, was out there for nearly six months. It was only spotted once in all that time. She came ashore with her gangway hatch and forward hatch open.

I am convinced the Nina will wash up on an Australian beach. The question is, how many survivors will there be? We want to bring all 7 home and we thank the cruising community for their support in doing that. In the end, it will benefit all sailors.

Tim