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Old 11-03-2013
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Delezynski Delezynski is offline
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Re: Sailing, safety, & size

Quote:
Originally Posted by outbound View Post
Greg yesterday there was a break in the wind and rain so finished rigging the dyneema stay and hung the storm jib to measure for sheets while looking at the runs for areas of potential chafe. Got asked " why is that sail such a funny ugly color?". Oh well.
Still, I understand you get it. What I don't understand is how you can believe there is any situation where offshore you would feel safer in your boat than mine.i respect your experience but just thinking back over the last few months when we had multiple days over 30kt and I felt blessed we were still cooking hot food, sleeping without trouble and feeling very secure and in control on watch. Please give some concrete examples where you think smaller is better
Outbound,

Ugly color! We love our tanbark!!
I am doing Teak just now. That and a bit of rewiring of our solar system. Having the boat on the hard close by helps me get my projects done, bit by bit.

We have spent days at sea just like you. I think it sounds like our boats are comparably equipped. We have faced some big waves and wind. Some more than the boat in the video that had to be abandoned, what was it, 30 ft & 50 K or MPH??? (we were NOT facing an approaching hurricane) We heave-to when we need to, sail when we need to and yes even motor when we need to. Like you guys, WE NEVER go hungry aboard. My waist line shows it! As we cruised I found I am always gaining weight!

Please understand, I am not saying my boat is safer than yours. What I tried to say in my posting is that size is only one part of the "safety" equation, not the "be all/end all" measure of safety. How the boat was designed, how the boat was built, how the boat is outfitted, how the crew can handle her, it ALL goes into safety. If we moved onto your boat and I had a year to learn it's system inside and out, and was sure Jill could work it without power. Then the safety factor would be the same. I am also looking at my age in the factor. No matter what I tell myself, I AM getting older and can not handle the physical things I used to. But I am also not willing to put my life in the hands of an electrical system. NOT that they fail often, just that we all know they do. We have many friends who went from smaller boats to bigger, then as time goes on, back to smaller so they can handle them.

I keep asking Jill about getting a Montgomery 17, as a "summer home". But that would NOT do blue water with us aboard.

I am always amazed at people who look at our small boat (YES, we know it's small) and tell us it's unsafe for us to go "out there".

Take the guy with a bucket of money, he goes out and buys a 55 foot boat, because it feels good at the boat show and he likes the way, when it's backed into the boat show slip, he gets on and off the boat. He takes delivery and has never owned more than a dream before this! Now that is unsafe, no matter the boat. By the way, we watched this take place!! And was at a marina when the back end of said boat needed repairs as it did not back up just like a car.

Some day, that combination will be safe if he keeps learning and knows the limits, just not now.

Greg
By the way, I NEVER thought this thread would grow like this! I was just asking a few views on the subject. Looks like I got them.
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Greg & Jill Delezynski
Nor'Sea 27, Guenevere
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