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Old 02-01-2002
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Double Spinn Sheets

Generally when you have sheets and guys the boat is intended for a dip pole jibe. You can still use sheets and guys with an end for end but that is typically only done in heavy air on a boat that would normally be end for ended. I will talk through both.

Starting with a dip pole jibe, a dip pole jibe generally takes a lot of people to do well. You need a minimum crew of seven to do a dip pole smoothly on a boat the size of an 8 meter. Starting from the bow, you need a foredeck person at the stem, a mast person, a pit person, a spin trimmer on starboard and a spin trimmer on port, a mainsail trimmer and a helmsman.

As the jibe begins the foredeck person grabs the lazy guy and walks to the bow. The mast man raises the mast end of the pole up the track as to a premarked point that will allow the pole to swing across the deck just above the bow pulpit. The pit person eases the pole lift to a premarked point that will allow the pole to swing across the deck just above the bow pulpit. The mainsail trimmer brings the mainsail to the centerline and holds it there. The original windward spinacker trimmer tensions the spin sheet and then eases the guy, saying "guy blown". The mast man swings the pole in toward the centerline where the foredeck person blows the old guy and inserts the new guy in the jaws, relatches the pole pin, and then swings the pole to the new windward, saying ''Made''. At which point the mast person lowers the pole on the mast to its previous position, the new windward trimmer tensions the guy and eases the sheet, and the pit person raises the pole lift to its original position. When the sail is set and flying the new spin trimmer says,''flying'', so the mainsail trimmer knows to let the mainsail out and so that the helmsman knows that the boat can be turned up to windward.

That is a dip pole jibe.

End for ending with lazy guy allows the pole to be made before the guy is tensioned which allows end for ending on bigger boats or on windier days. End for ending with a lazy guy takes five people on a boat the size of an 8 meter. A foredeck person, a port and starboard spin trimmer, a mainsail trimmer and a helmsman. At the beginning of a jibe the foredeck person takes the lazy guy and stands at the mast, and if necessary lowers the pole end to within reach. The former weather trimmer tensions the sheet and eases the guy. The foredeck person releases the pole from the mast. The mainsail trimmer brings the main to the centerline and holds it there. The foredeck person puts the lazy guy in the jaws of the pole and walks the pole out to the new windward. The foredeck person then removes the previously used guy from the new inboard end of the pole and puts the pole on the mast, saying ''Made''. At that point the new guy is tensioned and the former sheet eased. The sheet trimmer then says''flying'', so the mainsail trimmer knows to let the mainsail out and so that the helmsman knows that the boat can be turned up to windward.

A couple additional points, The guy should be heavier than the sheets and have a donut and chafe gear at the jaws. The sheets should have an extra large bail so that the lazy guy can be snapped into that bail. In lighter air the guy can be removed to reduce the weight on the guy and the guy can be snapped to the sheet to act as twings.

I really love 8 meters and I am delighted to hear that you are building a replica. I am trying to remember who died in 1954. I am guessing Clinton Crane because I think that L. Francis Herreshoff and Starling Burgess died a few years later. Who designed your boat and is she a replica of "Cayuga" by any chance?

Jeff
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