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Old 03-08-2007
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Just a comment to your above thread, Soul searcher:

On a passage, if someone gets seasick - it is not like single handing, it is worse. Now you have to handle the boat by yourself AND take care or yourself AND take care of the other person. Better they were not along at all. Don't say you have never gotten seasick - say that you have never gotten seasick YET! I know a very avid passagemaking cruiser that delivers (or used to) across the Atalantic and other far runs. He told me that he used to say, "I don't get seasick." Then one fine week (the emphasis on week) he was in a storm with roaring 30+ footers. He got sick, as did the rest of the crew. For other people their threshold may be 50 footers. Of course, it would not matter to me at 50 footers beacuse I would be too busy cleaning up the other end the first time I saw that mountain approaching!!! (smile).

Many people (myself included) will get seasick the first day and then are awesome. Some sailors call this "Getting your sea legs". If I am not in rough seas the first day, I do not get sea sick at all and am fine. If I am in about 8-10+ for over 15-20 hours, it gets me. That is an important thing to know for anyone making a passage or cruising - WHAT IS YOUR THRESHOLD! You need to know how, when, where and for how long you get sea sick. Unless I know it is smooth sailing, I pop a patch on before I leave (24 hours). If it is less than about 12 hours, I never bother. My wife on the other hand swears by ginger. It takes care of her. I can't stand it, but will use it some. Mostly just makes me burp and... well, whatever.

Funny how few people know themselves, but take off on a boat and get suprised. Seamanship starts at the dock and ends at the sea... not the other way around. Much of what screws people up is a lack of preparation when the lines are on, not when they are off.

Just my opinions though.

- CD
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