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Old 12-15-2013
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Re: English Boatyard

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
Dylan ..... I'll admit some of those boats are less than easy on the eye but small cheap boats put the English on the water when they could afford nowt else. Sod it, homely is better than nothing at all while for grubbing about the English coast and shallow estuaries requires small stout and shallow draft more so than white flashy and yacht club.
Description of "Dulcibella", from "The Riddle of the Sands" --

"She seemed very small (in point of fact she was seven tons), something over thirty feet in length and nine in beam, a size very suitable to week-ends in the Solent, for such as liked that sort of thing; but that she should have come from Dover to the Baltic suggested a world of physical endeavour of which I had never dreamed. I passed to the aesthetic side. Smartness and beauty were essential to yachts, in my mind, but with the best resolves to be pleased I found little encouragement here. The hull seemed too low, and the mainmast too high; the cabin roof looked clumsy, and the skylights saddened the eye with dull iron and plebeian graining. What brass there was, on the tiller-head and elsewhere, was tarnished with sickly green. The decks had none of that creamy purity which Cowes expects, but were rough and grey, and showed tarry exhalations round the seams and rusty stains near the bows. The ropes and rigging were in mourning when contrasted with the delicate buff manilla so satisfying to the artistic eye as seen against the blue of a June sky at Southsea. Nor was the whole effect bettered by many signs of recent refitting. An impression of paint, varnish, and carpentry was in the air; a gaudy new burgee fluttered aloft; there seemed to be a new rope or two, especially round the diminutive mizzen-mast, which itself looked altogether new. But all this only emphasized the general plainness, reminding one of a respectable woman of the working-classes trying to dress above her station, and soon likely to give it up.

That the ensemble was businesslike and solid even my untrained eye could see. Many of the deck fittings seemed disproportionately substantial. The anchor-chain looked contemptuous of its charge; the binnacle with its compass was of a size and prominence almost comically impressive, and was, moreover the only piece of brass which was burnished and showed traces of reverent care. Two huge coils of stout and dingy warp lay just abaft the mainmast, and summed up the weather-beaten aspect of the little ship. I should add here that in the distant past she had been a lifeboat, and had been clumsily converted into a yacht by the addition of a counter, deck, and the necessary spars. She was built, as all lifeboats are diagonally, of two skins of teak, and thus had immense strength, though, in the matter of looks, all a hybrid's failings."

Read it online here.

Download it free here.

While not as good as the book, the video does have a replica Dulcibella, lots of well-filmed on-location sailing scenes (looks a lot like some of Dylan Winter's videos), and Jenny Agutter. Oh, and Michael York & Simon MacCorkindale.
Watch it on youtube
.
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"The skipper should be the calmest person on board.
It is good for the morale of those around you. However, if everyone around you is frightened then be aware of the possibility that they know something you donít."

~~Dylan Winter,
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Last edited by manatee; 12-16-2013 at 05:35 PM.
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