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Old 02-24-2014
JonEisberg JonEisberg is offline
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Re: Sailors beware

Quote:
Originally Posted by rbyham View Post
It would seem fairly easy and affordable to develop a tie down system at least...
What, you think they're just stacking them up there, and letting them be?





From wiki:

Quote:
Numerous systems are used to secure containers aboard ships, depending on factors such as the type of ship, the type of container, and the location of the container.[33][34] Stowage inside the holds of fully cellular (FC) ships is simplest, typically using simple metal forms called container guides, locating cones, and anti-rack spacers to lock the containers together.[35] Above-decks, without the extra support of the cell guides, more complicated equipment is used.[33] Three types of systems are currently in wide use: lashing systems, locking systems, and buttress systems.[33] Lashing systems secure containers to the ship using devices made from wire rope, rigid rods, or chains and devices to tension the lashings, such as turnbuckles.[33] The effectiveness of lashings is increased by securing containers to each other, either by simple metal forms (such as stacking cones) or more complicated devices such as twist-lock stackers.[33] A typical twist-lock is inserted into the casting hole of one container and rotated to hold it in place, then another container is lowered on top of it.[36] The two containers are locked together by twisting the device's handle.[36] A typical twist-lock is constructed of forged steel and ductile iron and has a shear strength of 48 metric tons.[37]

The buttress system, used on some large container ships, uses a system of large towers attached to the ship at both ends of each cargo hold.[38] As the ship is loaded, a rigid, removable stacking frame is added, structurally securing each tier of containers together.[38]
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