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Old 05-17-2007
eherlihy's Avatar
eherlihy eherlihy is offline
Learning the HARD way...
 
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Bullet points on staying dry

SD, as usual, has some excellent points:
  • Inner and outer cuffs for the sleeves
  • Retro-reflective tape patches
  • hand warmer-type fleece lined pockets
  • Ventilation
  • High fleece-lined collar
  • Hood
  • High bib and back on Pants
  • Pants that will accept (go over, and cinch down on) boots

VMacDonald and I mentioned the heavy nylon cloth in our earlier replies.
Other attributes include:
  • Heavy nylon zippers for strength
  • Cloth that covers the zipper, held with velcro - so that water does not penetrate through the zipper
  • High visibility hood material (Florescent yellow) with a bill to keep rain out of my face
  • Cinch at waist, arms, and around hood to keep water out
  • Attachment points for whistle, and emergency locator beacon (flasher)

I also ride a motorcycle, and have seperate rain gear for that. Raingear was a necessity when I rode back from Key West to Boston during the torrential rain that we encountered in NC/VA, and snow in DC and NJ March 16 & 17. Motorcycle raingear, however, would not be a substitute for Sailing raingear. It has none of the above features, is much lighter, more "rubbery," and baggier (meant to be worn over leathers) than Sailing raingear.

While I also try to avoid bad weather (especially with the admiral aboard), I have been in Boston outer harbor, on my way home when all hell broke loose from above. It *still* takes over an hour to get back to the mooring, and I still have to take down, and stow the sails. Having to do this while warm and dry, vs wet and cold, is well worth the $200 that I spent on raingear. It would have been worth $2000 if the admiral were on board with me that evening .

I also agree with 'Dog's comment on safety. You are much more likely to endanger yourself, and your vessel, if you are making compromises because you are uncomfortable.

Again; what is it worth for you to be warm and dry on a boat?
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