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Old 08-19-2002
Sailormon6 Sailormon6 is offline
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MacGregor 22 vs. Catalina 22

Either the C22 or the Mac22 will be easy to tow, set up and launch. My first small cruiser was a C22, and I once towed it to Michigan and back from southern Ohio with an old 6 cylinder Rambler.

Compare the weight and workmanship of the two boats and their hardware, and you will find the C22 to be stronger and somewhat better built.

The Catalina''s small jib will give you decent performance on a light-air inland lake, but I would suggest you negotiate with the seller for a price reduction of a few hundred dollars to help you buy a 130% or 150% jib. The 110% jib is o.k., but a larger jib will help in light air.

In 25 years of sailing, I have never known of either a C22 or a Mac22 that sank, although I''m sure it must have happened somewhere. Most small cruising boats don''t have flotation, because it occupies too much interior space that could be used for storage and other purposes, and because, in my opinion, it just isn''t crucial to safety if the occupants have pfd''s. Those boats are designed to be sailed in more protected waters, where you are close to shore at all times.

There is a MacGregor website, but it seems to be relatively inactive and of very limited usefulness to owners. There is also a Catalina 22 website, and it is extremely active, and loaded with thoughtful suggestions for repairs and upgrades, and information about where to obtain parts and supplies.

Most people buy a smaller boat at first, and after a year or two they move up to a bigger boat. So, regardless of which boat you buy, be careful that you don''t pay more than the current market value for it in your area, so you won''t take too much of a loss if you decide to move up.

The sailing club at my lake (Brookville Lake in southern Indiana) is very sociable, and organizes lots of family picnics, raft-ups, racing, winter banquets and other events, and the membership cost is really nominal. You will get much more out of sailing if you join your local club.
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