SailNet Community - View Single Post - JEFF H input wanted
View Single Post
  #7  
Old 09-26-2002
Jeff_H's Avatar
Jeff_H Jeff_H is online now
Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Annapolis, Md
Posts: 6,559
Thanks: 5
Thanked 92 Times in 69 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about
JEFF H input wanted

Nice tirade and I am glad that you like your boat but lets see if we can keep the record accurate.....I think we both agree that C&C began as a design partnership between Cuthbertson and Cassian in the early 1960''s. Fairly early in the 1960''s C&C began designing boats across a wide size range. Some were built semi-custom basis with C&C contracting the tooling and construction to existing Canadian boat builders. Sold under the name of C&C Yachts as early as 1967 or so the C&C Custom 41 was a good example of this.

Also during the 1960''s C&C was instrumental in what I consider a very sophisticated boat building concept. C&C working in concert with a number of Canadian yards began designing boats in a number of size ranges in which several yards would share the cost of tooling. These different yards would each build their own distinct versions of these basic designs off of the same tooling.

Probably the first of these syndicated designs was the C&C 22''s which were produced as the Grampian Classic 22 (which is the 22 foot C&C that I actually owned. I worked in the Grampian Booth at the 1965 NY Boatshow.), the Bluejacket and as the Viking 22. There was a 4th version whose name escapes me.

C&C designed a number of 30 footers before the C&C 30 mk1. These included the Corvette (which was a nice K/CB boat), the Redwing which was a fin keel 30 footer with a terribly pinched transom, and the Northwind which was a K/Cb boat but which was very similar in hull form to the C&C 30 mk1.)

There was a whole collection of 35 footers including the Frigate and Redjacket (named for the first C&C to win the SORC) but again I am not recalling the names of the other 35''s.

There were also a number of 41 footers including the Redline, Crusader, C&C Custom 41, and Newport 41.

I did not say that the Redwing 35 never impressed me. I said the Redwing never impressed me. The Redwing was an early C&C designed 30 footer. It obviously was a very different boat than the C&C 35 mk 1 (being 5 feet shorter) and also very different from the nearly 6 year later design for the C&C 30 mk1.

You are mistaken when you say that C&C did not use foam coring. They pioneered it in the 1960''s. My Grampian Classic had foam cored decks and a foam cored, hand laid up system of stringers and athwartships frames. In the late 1960''s they moved away from this system to a less expensive balsa coring.

The first C&C 24 that I sailed on was a 1973 model. It was a super boat for its day. Qute a bit faster than my S&S designed Northstar 500 that I owned in those days.

During the 1970''s C&C went in and out of finacial trouble. They recycled many of their designs with subtle changes keeping them in production far longer than probably made sense given the revolutions in yacht design that were taking place during this period.

Lastly, I am glad to show you a C&C afficionado who thinks the C&C 30 is a dud. I''m one. I was a fan of these boats since the 1960''s when I began sailing on them and worked selling them. Of course you are welcome to tie up at my dock next time you are in Annapolis and take me out for a sail to try to prove me wrong! 8^)

Respectfully,
Jeff
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook