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Old 10-07-2007
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Liveaboard, class, and privilege

As a result of a few recent threads, I 've begun to think about the liveaboard culture, and the myth of simplicity that accompanies it. I bought the myth (literally) and now I'm having second thoughts. While I have seen folks that live on shabby, reef-growing scows that have become protected ecological areas, I suspect that most on this forum do not fit that category.

I could be wrong, but folks who really are doing it simple, on the cheap, might not have access to a computer, or internet. Does that mean those likely to be found here might represent a more privileged class, for all the talk of simplicity?
Those who can afford a well-found yacht, 5% of its value in maintenance per annum, cruising kitties, upgrades, monthly living expenses, cash on hand for disasters, etc, are not likely to be starving artists as much as successful ones.
While I can see how one's footprint would be far smaller than living on land, It is all relative, and I'm starting to think that contrary to myth, often it is far from a really minimalist lifestyle.

Not about judging people so much as examining my own assumptions about my own standard of living. Maybe in my imagination Walden Pond embodies simplicity, and if that is an acceptable beginning how does modern liveaboarding compare? I know it's a continuum, but perhaps most of our so-called simple lifestyles are nothing more than a reduced suburbia - with many of it's flaws - on the water.

I guess I see simplicity as a minimal amount of resources tied up in possessions, a minimal of complexity in one's life and one's surroundings resulting in the freedom to spend one's time in more valuable pursuits than the simple earning of money for subsistence, or consumer goods.
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