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Old 12-23-2002
tsenator tsenator is offline
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Comparison literature

msl,

I''m with you. While I agree with Jeff that a heavy grounding of an encapsulated keel will *potentially* cause long term water damage if "not taken care of". But I hope he doesn''t mean he would rather have externally bolted on "fin keel" in a grounding, as opposed to keel''s which are a full or modified full keel (which many encapsulated keels are).

It comes down to simple physics that, in a grounding, there would be more torque and force on a typical fin keel vs. a typical full or modified full keel. In a full or modified full keel there is just so much more keel area to hull area to absorb all that grounding force. Really, think about it, cruisers careen full or modified full keel boats all the time. It is *much* more rare to ever see a fin keel do that.

(FYI for those that don''t know what Careening is go here )
http://www.sailnet.com/collections/articles/index.cfm?articleid=jkrets0066

This past summer I saw a very large modified full keel boat, on the hard, with a *huge* chunk taken out of the forward part of the keel(3-4 inches deep and about 8 inches high). It must have repeatedly banged up against sometime hard for a while. There was splintered fiberglass and whatnot all over and the damage must have been there for a while because the "chunk" had big barnacles all over it. Obviously this area needs to be completely cleaned out, removed and fiberglassed again but it seemed to not cause any real long term damage. I really don''t think many bolted on fin keel''s would have taken it as well, especially if it was an iron keel . I think that is one of the few advantages to these full/modified full keel designs (if its designed that way), because they can design a generous amount of "deadwood" area to this area of the keel to absorb and "sacrifice" the forward edge of the keel while saving the rest of the boat. Kind of like "crumple zones" on a car.
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