SailNet Community - View Single Post - Crimping versus Soldering
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Old 02-15-2008
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Regarding this thread, it has actually been a while since this was dicsussed. Bringing up these topics periodically is good for discussion because it allows others that did not follow the thread at the time or were not members at the time to enter into the debate. That being said, although I don't mind another discourse on soldering versus crimping, it was not why I brought this up. It was to point out a very specific example of what happens to soldered connections on a boat. THis is a first hand, twenty year old "beta test", on the effects of soldering: it does not hold up and does not last. Given that many of the other connections were original crimps, and they did not fail, I can see no reason to solder on a boat and feel ABYC should change from not reccomending to soldering, to flat out rejecting it.

If I recall correctly, and I do not have the rules in front of me, I believe it says something like, "The use of soldered joints is not reccomended on any vessel..."

I feel it should say, "The use of soldered joints will NOT be used on any vessel..."

Maybe my boat is only one example and not conclusive in determining the long term effects of soldering, but given the other testimonials, I feel it sure does not play in the favor of soldering joints, under any circumstances.

I will also point out that, although we had corrosion on either side of the joints (which I would almost guess came from "super heating the copper", though I cannot be sure), the most serious corrosion actually came from the joints themselves. THe solder had hairline cracks which had corroded and made the joint poor. In some cases, this joint had failed alltogether an you could bend the connection at that break.

Regarding liquid tape:

I have used it. THe term black snot comes to mind. I have used it to fill the back side of lugs that I have crimped to seal them off from air/moisture (the part that, after you crimp, would face the lug after you heat shrink... not sure if I am describing it correctly). I have also used it to paint on the threads of terminal connections as a type of electrical locktite to slow/prevent nuts from easily backing off. I think it does have its uses. However, I do not think it is in any way a substitute for heat shrink, and I absolutely cringe any time I have to pull it out. It makes a horrible mess.

Just my experiences.

- CD
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