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Old 12-24-2003
m000ve0ver m000ve0ver is offline
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Powerboat Cruising info needed

Thank you all for the input. I hope to hear a lot more as well. All this really helps me to find new areas of research and also new ideas or directions.

slipacre: I have put much consideration into the "money pit" factor. Seems to me that any direction I choose will be costly. My guess from what I have read is that it seems to be a 5 year cycle. You make your initial investment and then maintain it for 5 years before you need to really dump money into major repairs. Sails and Rigging being the large money on sailboats and fasteners/wood replacement/motor work on powerboats (such as my example boat). The boat I was looking at is already low priced and I would hope to get it even lower because of the small market it attracts. This leaves me enough budget to re-fasten, replace boards, bottom coat, rebuild the engine and purchase electronics. The interior work is cosmetic and can be done over time. Once all this work is done I calculated to be on par with a fairly well set up Sailboat that would still need work anyway. Having this work completed I hoped to get a good 5 years out of the boat with regular maintenance and bottom coats. Maybe I am wrong. Please anyone jump in here.

You did bring up a good item for me to research. That is the willingness of yards to participate in wooden boats. I had not added that to the equation. I am researching that now. As far as tools, I have TONS. I even have a portable sawmill for turning logs into the lumber I will need. I also have 15+ years of welding experience (which has made me look at metal boats).

WHOOSH: A little rain on my dream is not going to stop me. I can take the heavy weather and appreciate the lessons learned from it. When you say power boat crews anchored in weather, I wonder. Because there are so many different types of powerboats. Sailboats are all very much alike. Powerboats are almost all different. I am sure there are many types that can not go out in weather. The goal of my post was to find out the difference or at least get closer.

The flopper stoppers in Beebe''s book are referred to as just that. I do understand the difference in systems to work underway and at anchor. It''s just hard to dump everything I have read about into a post. As I am sure it is hard to dump advice into a short post. Beebe uses stoppers that look like an airplane while anchor stoppers are like mushrooms.

I have considered the trailer idea and didn''t spend more than 5 minutes on it. I would rather learn to sail if that is what it took to accomplish my dream. I am a huge fan of bigger boat but sailing a bigger boat requires skill I don''t have. But powering a bigger boat seems manageable.

Glad to hear you like the looks of the boat. At least I am not alone there. I really love the classic look and low profile lines.

Foxglove: Your input about motor vs sail is exactly the same as I found in many many peoples journals or logs. I have actually considered your suggestion. Figuring I could even possibly learn to sail on optimum days since they (the sails) would be there calling to me. It''s interesting to hear that you get such high mpg. I am going to have to research this more. I have found that most sailboats hold 90 gallons or less. Adding tankage is very high weight and probably not too good if it raises the waterline. Another consideration however is the cost of maintenance. Sure less use would provide less wear. But the rigging is still aging. And mistakes can ruin sails. And lot''s of motoring means more engine maintenance. I just don''t know the effect on the "money pit" factor.

ALL: Again, thank you so much for your input. Please keep the input coming. Good or Bad I want to hear it all. I am going to get out there. I just don''t know how yet.
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