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Old 03-23-2004
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Cheoy Lee ballast/displacement ratio

Seafarer started out in the 1960''s as an importer of very high quality, Phillip Rhodes designed Dutch boats. For some reason, when the Common Market was formed in the 1960''s, Seafarer ceased importing boats and built its own facility in Huntington, New York. I was pretty familiar with that facility because when I was 13 or so, I ordered an eight foot Seafarer sailing dinghy for my first boat. They never were able to deliver it.

The first boats that Seafarer built in the U.S. were a series of McCurdy and Rhodes (not Phillip Rhodes but his son)designed CCA era racer/cruisers. Build quality had slipped dramatically from the quality of the Dutch boats, and continued to slide down hill from there. The 34 that you mention was probably one of these CCA era keel centerboarders. That boat was offered either as a K/Cb or as a fin keeler, sloop or yawl, traditional or dinette layout.

While not terribly robust or well finished, they were pretty nice sailing boats for that day. By modern standards they are pretty slow boats and with thier long ends, they are not very good in a chop and do not have a lot of weight carrying capacity.

The sail handling gear had a number of options and upgrades with the base gear being totally inadequate for a boat with sails the size of the 34. The one that I knew up in Charleston, had the original basic winches and I helped the fellow swap them out for adequately sized cockpit winches in the late 1970''s.

The one that I knew had a dinette layout. It was severely storage challenged except that it had a very large set of cockpit lockers. These boats have a very cramped interior layout for a 34 footer, providing the space of perhaps a more modern 28-30 or so footer.

The Pearson 33 is a very similar boat except that build quality was a little better and perhaps they would be a little better offshore boats as well. Finishes were not as nice on the Pearson but if I remember correctly storage was a bit better on the Pearson.

Jeff
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