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Old 02-25-2005
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Cruising Catamarans Offshore

Thor, I can not resist. lol!

Here are some more:

http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-cp/history/Loy/USNI.html

http://www.hawaiiocean.com/HOI_Archives/HOI_2000-06/#Casulaties

http://www.ussailing.org/safety/Rescues/8_5_00.htm

http://abc.net.au/nt/news/200502/s1306679.htm

http://www.amsa.gov.au/about_amsa/Media_releases/2002/2002_jun_3.asp

http://www.freep.com/news/statewire/sw105968_20041020.htm

They include sinking catamarans, all cruiser boats.

I also would like to quote a well known (and responsible) cruiser catamaran manufacturer (good cats) who says in his advertising, to help people choose the right sail boat, about multihull safety:



"Capsize is rare with well sailed cruising multihulls...The important factor, as with a car, is that the degree of risk is up to the driver/skipper. Drive or sail too fast for the conditions and the risk of a crash is higher. The decision is yours. It is not taken away from you by a heavy keel below, making it impossible to go fast. Nobody seriously suggests weighing ...a sailboat ... to limit performance, just because a few may not have the skill or maturity to sail a fast type of craft safely.

Thus, like a car, a multihull has the capability of very high speeds when desired, and the risk factor can consequently be higher.

In general, the risk factor will only begin to increase when boat speed exceeds 15 knots while reaching, or about 8 knots to windward.

Capsize thus must always be considered as a possibility, even if a remote one, and be prepared for. In this regard, there should be a special safety compartment that is accessible from both above and below for storing safety gear that will be immediately available if capsized."




I would say this is common sense and that was precisely what I meant when I said in a previous post:


"Main difference (in my opinion) is that an ocean monohull can take a lot more "errors" made by the skipper and need a lot less attention. The boat can take care of himself (almost) no matter what. With a Cat you have to pay a lot more attention to the wind, to the sail the boat carries, regarding the wind. It is not only the speed that is bigger; everything happens a lot faster in a cat, including capsizing."


Paulo
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