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Old 10-01-2009
joethecobbler joethecobbler is offline
cruising all I can
 
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The Dock is for the dreamers, the mooring balls are for the "vacationers" , the Hook is for the Sailors.
Water- Get a watermaker, or if confined to sailing in the US- I've never been denied water. Usually take it on when pumping out blackwater. (many pumpouts are free for the asking). If you need to "ferry" water to your anchorage or mooring you might consider getting a bladder tank and transfer pump. fill the bladder tank while it's in the dinghy then pump the water into the tanks on the mainship, no lugging cans.
Power- don't do it backwards. Figure out what your power requirements are , then size the appropriate solar/wind combination. Use the gas or diesel generator for eccessive power consumption situations,i.e. short term power tool use,vaccuuming,etc.
Landing dinghy- this varies depending on location and situation. If your living in one place and hold a day job you might need to make an arrangement w/ a marina or private dock for landing. However if your your driving to work, get a trailor for your dinghy and launch and retrieve it each day from a public launch.Leave the trailor on the tow vehicle as this will allow you to park the vehicle overnight in the launch lot, as it has a boat trailor attached it will not be questioned when parking overnight.
Personal hygene- If your staying aboard any length of time or permanently, consider a vessel with a shower or be prepared to shower in the cockpit in all weather conditions.
Heating/cooling- A/C hasn't been around long, people have.Acclimate yourself and you'll be happier over all.
Heat is easy to produce,I choose a wood stove for the easy and free wood aspect. but kero,diesel, alcohol,propane are other options.
Trash- find a trash can,they're all over the place,be discreet.

When I first started spending a considerable amount of time aboard these same issues presented themselves. With a little bit of ponderance, a bit of ingenuity, and much determination, I'm finding methods that work for my situation .If you decide to live aboard or be an extended cruiser , you too will develop your own ways to address your concerns.
Some (or many) of the ways of dealing w/ life aboard I've borrowed from other cruisers and adjusted them to my personal requirements.
I'm still learning new things daily ! I enjoy simplifying my life and becoming more autonimous continually.
Having a family and dogs abourd greatly increases the task load and difficulty. So , I find the better I can plan ahead and the further I can plan ahead, the more pleasant the experience becomes for everyone and minimizes the anxiety over provisioniong and making landfall in new or seldom visited locations.
One last thing, I extremely enjoy approaching other sailors/boaters that are anchored or moored. A great deal of information can be extracted about the present location and/or the next expected stop. Getting multiple responses and perspectives helps in determining what may work best for me. But just like the cruising guides and other information sources, the accuracy and reliability often varies depending on the source . power vessels and sailing craft have greatly different perspectives as do different types of crew aboard. So just like my opinion here, take it with a grain of salt.
The first time I traveled the Delaware Bay I met a gentleman who told me it could not be sailed and that if the conditions got poor there was no place to seek shelter. It worried me so much I stayed put for two more days concerned about the next leg of the journey. Fortunately I met other sailors who said just the opposite and offered their experiences and advice on where to duck in along the way. the weather did get nasty in the Delaware bay and I took shelter in Cohansey creek for 2-3 days. Then I Sailed on .
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