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Old 10-30-2009
steelboat steelboat is offline
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sv restless

Omatako, believe me the irony of the boat's name was not lost on me when I chose it. Trying to come up with a name for a project like this proved to be very difficult, and many were tried and discarded along the way. I kept thinking that a name would eventually just suggest itself, but about 6 months before launch I knew we had to get serious and come up with something. And that's what I chose. Now finally it's the boat that's getting restless. She wants to go.

I guess it's also important to understand that I did many thousands of miles on or over the ocean during the building process. I would have gone even crazier than I maybe am if I hadn't. For a lot of the first half of the construction I was commercial swordfishing, and getting a real overdose of salt sea air every summer. For the last half we were never without a smaller boat, which the family and I spent every spare moment on during the season. I crewed on years of wednesday night races, sailed with friends from Halifax to Grenada, did the Marion-Bermuda on a J-40, cruised the Caribbean half a dozen times, and spent inordinate amounts of time chasing striped bass. I've seen 100 knots of wind on the Grand Banks, 1200 miles from home (kind of like jogging from Boston to Chicago just to get to that god-forsaken place) and also seen the moon rising over Minot's light with no wind at all, stripers splashing all over the place.

So although we were on the water as much as possible during the season, boatbuilding was a way to stay involved with boats during the off season. That's part of why it took so long... i've always felt that boat building was winter's work, in this climate at least... Miles Davis on the stereo, snow out the window, in the shop playing with stuff... not a bad way to live. And when spring comes, hang up the project and get out on the water. Worked for us.

And there's no embarrassment in preferring to sailing a moderately nice boat to working on a beautiful one, if it works for you, and I assume it does. For me, just being on and around the water is the thing, and I get a kick out of any kind of boat at all. I just happened to get a little carried away with this one.

Again, thanks for the comments.

Best, Bob S/V Restless
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