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Old 01-13-2010
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Gulfstream Crossing with Northerly Winds

It seems as though the generally accepted credo is NEVER do a Gulfstream crossing from Florida to the Bahamas when there is any northerly component to the wind. Reason being, a northerny wind against a southern current will generally result in big rising seas and a miserable experience.

I've accepted this advice...but then I see data like this from NOAA for Zone 651 and 671, which is generally the forecast to watch for South Florida for a crossing to the Bahamas.

Quote:
Zone 651 (COASTAL WATERS FROM DEERFIELD BEACH TO OCEAN REEF, FL OUT 20 NM)

TODAY
NORTH WINDS 10 TO 15 KNOTS. SEAS 2 TO 4 FEET. INTRACOASTAL
WATERS A LIGHT CHOP.

TONIGHT
NORTHEAST WINDS 7 TO 12 KNOTS. SEAS 2 TO 4 FEET.
INTRACOASTAL WATERS A LIGHT CHOP.

Zone 671 (20nm out to the Territorial Waters of Bahamas)

TODAY
NORTH WINDS 10 TO 15 KNOTS. SEAS 2 TO 4 FEET.

TONIGHT
NORTHEAST WINDS 7 TO 12 KNOTS. SEAS 2 TO 4 FEET.
It seems that if someone wanted to make a passage to the Bahamas (east), a north wind would give a beam reach the entire way there, making for a quick passage since on my boat, beam reach is the fastest point of sail. How come the seas are so "calm" with this north wind? Are there corralaries to the generally accepted wisdom that I'm not aware of?

Does the north wind have to be blowing for a while (24 hours+) before the Gulfstream is dangerous?

Enlighten me on the nuances of the Gulfstream Current!
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Last edited by night0wl; 01-13-2010 at 04:27 PM.
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