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Old 02-19-2010
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jaschrumpf jaschrumpf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n794877 View Post
Been a trailer sailor / dingy sailor all my life and have never kept any of my boats in a wet slip in a marina. With this economy, there seems to be more wet slips available now at cheaper prices. Anyhoo, can anyone point me to an article on securing your boat in a wet slip. For instance, how do you keep it from being stolen? How many lines do you use? Proper marina etiquette. I searched this site for info but couldn't seem to find the info I am looking for.
Thanks.
How do you keep your car from being stolen? The answer is "You can't, if someone really wants to steal it."

I've had my boat on a slip since I bought her back on 2007. If someone wanted to break into her they'd only need a screwdriver to pry the hasp off the cabin's hatch cover. That's pretty much a given for any boat, and if someone really wanted to steal a boat they could just cruise in with a powerboat, cut the lines, haul her out to a desolate spot and do with her what they would. Bwahaha

The wonderful advantage of being in a slip is that you drive down to your boat and take her out when you want to. She's floating there, ready to satisfy your every sailing whim, and not on a trailer in the back yard or some storage lot somewhere that you have to go pick her up and drag her down to some public boat ramp somewhere and stand in line to launch and recover her.

Also consider the wonderfulness of just sitting in her and experiencing the living flow of water around her -- you can't match that in a boat on a trailer!

In any decent marina your neighbors will look out for you, and you should look out for them. That's basic marina etiquette. If that means standing by as they dock in case they want to throw you a line, well, that just means when you're coming in and would like to toss someone a line, there just might be someone there to catch it.

Doubling lines at all time if you can't be there in a timely manner is also a good idea. If a storm pops up with 40-50 kt winds you'll feel a lot better knowing that you've got extra protection.

I hope some of this helps you make a decision. Personally, I wouldn't do it any other way.
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