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Old 08-07-2010
SEMIJim SEMIJim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrianjohnm View Post
Hi everyone. Name is Adrian and I am in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. I am the proud new owner of a 1973 Pearson 30....
Congratulations! Pearson P30s are fine boats! (Of course, we're just a bit biased .)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrianjohnm View Post
with the original Atomic 4!
Moyer Marine - Atomic 4 Engine Rebuilding and Parts will be an indispensable resource for your A4 questions and needs. Trust me on this. There are forums dedicated to all aspects of the A4 over there.

Hint: Get the oil change kit. The one that replaces the plug on the port side of the engine with one with a bronze tube and a hose, with fittings, to hook to it. Coupled with the right oil extractor, will make oil changes actually enjoyable .

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Originally Posted by Adrianjohnm View Post
Of course, like any new owner, I have questions. Many questions!!
Of course.

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Originally Posted by Adrianjohnm View Post
For example: I have no Outhaul,
Confused by that one. The outhaul is contained entirely on or w/in the boom. Why would that have been removed when the deck was re-cored? If you've no outhaul, to what is the clew of your main secured?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrianjohnm View Post
no Cunningham,
Our '76 P30, extensively re-rigged for racing, has no Cunningham, either. Doubt one was rigged on factory stock boats. I talked to the PO about it, once, and he just ran a line thru a turning block on the halyard organizer and straight back to a cam cleat next to the companionway. He'd rig it when he needed it and rely on one of his rather substantially-sized crew to just haul on it.

There used to be a really good thread, somewhere around here, on how to rig a Cunningham. I wasn't able to find it. The other site I hang on has two of them, tho:

The cunningham..how to make one, how to use one
Installing a Cunningham

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrianjohnm View Post
no boom vang,
A couple of blocks, one with a cam cleat, and some line and you've got yourself a vang. Or you can get either a solid vang or one of those fiberglass ones.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrianjohnm View Post
topping lift control sucks as it is not adjustable.
Ours has a pair of small fiddle blocks on the end, one with a clam cleat, for length adjustment.

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Originally Posted by Adrianjohnm View Post
No electrical wires leading from the cockpit to the mast either!
He took the wiring out and didn't replace it? You have no lights on the mast? That'll be a bit of a problem.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrianjohnm View Post
Went sailing last week and it took 20 minutes to put up the main and Genoa as the main halyard is at cockpit with a line lock before the winch. The Halyard would run at the base of the winch as the line lock keeps it down too low.
Took me a minute to figure out what you meant.

Our halyards all run through clutches in front of the winches. Shouldn't be a problem, unless the cleat/lock/clutch is too close to the winch. Our clutches are... thinking... a foot and a half of so in front of the winches? The entry/exits stand a bit prouder of the deck than the average lock or cleat, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrianjohnm View Post
I want to bring all the lines and controls to the cockpit and was hoping that you could help by sending me photos and description of your boats rigging.
I'll try to remember to take pictures, but it's pretty easy to describe.

All of our halyards run thru turning blocks attached to the halyard organizer at the base of the mast, thru deck organizers (blocks), thru the clutches and then to the winches--one on each side of the companionway.

Our vang is a couple of small fiddle blocks, one secured to the halyard organizer, the other to a small bail on the underside of the boom. The tail is long enough to reach back to the cockpit, but I do have to reach way forward to release the cam cleat.

We have no Cunningham atm. (It's on The List.)

The outhaul runs from the clew of the sail, thru a sheave inside the end of the boom, back forward inside the boom, around a sheave in the bottom of the boom, back, under the boom, thru a small Spinlock cleat (which, of course, ends-up right over the top of the companionway when the boom's centered--ask me how I know), then, finally, thru a small turning block to make it easy to haul down on.

Our mainsail reefing is relatively crude and limited, and, effectively, limited to the 1st reef. It's just a line that comes from a bail on the port side of the boom, up thru the first reefing point on the leech, down the starboard side of the sail, thru a sheave in the boom, forward inside the boom, out the starboard side nearby the gooseneck and back to a small standard cleat on the starboard side of the boom.

Both of our mainsails' luff reef points have been fitted with what our sailmaker calls "floppy rings" for ease of attachment to the hooks at the gooseneck.

For the kite: The halyard and the downhaul come back to the cockpit. The uphaul controls are on the mast. There's a pair of padeyes atop the cockpit coaming, near the stern, to which I secure turning blocks when we're flying a kite.

The foresail sheets run thru lead blocks on tracks on the toe rails, back thru turning blocks aft of the winches, and back forward to the winches. They're secured in clam cleats. (Which I hate for a variety of reasons, but I haven't figured-out how better to do.)

I think that covers it...? Oh yeah: The mainsheet. The PO moved the main traveler forward, so we now have mid-boom sheeting, and upgraded the traveler to a Harken windward sheeting traveler, which is a Beautiful Thing, lemme tell ya . We've since up graded the mainsheet purchase to 6:1, since The Admiral is usually on the helm and she mostly handles the mainsheet when we're double-handed. (I'm the deck monkey .)

Now I think I covered it all .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrianjohnm View Post
Also looking for ideas and various help...such as...How does one turn in reverse!!!!! Rudder is almost useless backing up!!!!
Few sailboats maneuver well in reverse. In fact: Few single-engine boats maneuver well in reverse. Our little 18' powerboat with an I/O drive doesn't maneuver all that much better in reverse than does our 30' sailboat.

Jim
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