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Old 10-05-2010
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Might want to look again, noonsite has SEVERAL PAGES OF INFORMATION on each country. For instance, it has this information on entering PUSAN, South Korea:

Quote:
It is compulsory to call port control on VHF Channel 16 or 12 and request permission to enter the harbour. If the call is not acknowledged, the vessel should be brought alongside the Navy barge moored close to the harbour entrance. The yacht may be searched here and firearms must be declared. Although foreign yachts are supposed to employ the services of a local agent to deal with all formalities, this rule is not strictly applied and one can carry out the clearing formalities oneself. This entails visits to customs, immigration and the port authority, all of which are located within the port compound. When leaving the harbour, it is necessary to stop again at the Navy barge and hand in the clearance papers. A copy will be retained, but the originals should be kept, as clearance will have to be shown at the next port of call.
It has the following information on CLEARANCE:

Quote:
Entry formalities and dealings with officials are generally difficult and time-consuming, the matters being further complicated by the fact that very few officials speak English or any other foreign language.

Because of the delicate nature of South Korea's relations with North Korea, the military authorities are extremely suspicious of any foreign vessel. Also, as it is forbidden to sail in South Korean waters at night, one should time one's arrival in daylight.

It is compulsory to clear in and out at every place and one is also likely to be stopped by various patrol boats belonging to the Navy, coastguard, marines or customs.
And this to say about Immigration/Passport information:

Quote:
All vsitors must have a valid passport.

Visa regulations change frequently and although currently visitors from many countries (The E.U., USA, Canada, New Zealand, Australia) may visit for up to 90 days without a visa, it is recommended that anyone planning to visit South Korea by yacht should obtain a visa in advance.

There are South Korean embassies in most capitals and also consulates in neighbouring countries, such as Japan, where there are consulates in Kobe, Shimonoseki and Fukuoka, the latter being reported as the most efficient in granting a visa.

Check one of the following websites:- travisa.com or korea4expats.com for more information.

For those whose passports contain evidence of visits to North Korea, special permission is needed to visit, and one should apply for a visa at least one month in advance.

Extensions are difficult to obtain. If longer than a 90-day stay is planned, a special long-term visa must be obtained in advance and one will have to apply for a residence certificate at the local immigration office.
So, I'm not really sure where you got the idea that it DOESN'T HAVE INFORMATION ON VISA/PASSPORT requirements and such....

Quote:
Originally Posted by surelyujest71 View Post
Thanks for the link, Sailingdog. I'm sure it will come in handy in the future. The location information is good to have; it seems to lack info on such things as Visa/Passport info, tho.

Anyone who's been to these areas, I'd love to hear about your experiences.

Thanks again.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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