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Old 12-15-2010
JonEisberg JonEisberg is offline
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Well, it’s one of the most beautiful, mystical places you’ll ever see, for starters… Even in its advanced state of decay, Havana is a wondrous place, a magnificent architectural and cultural example of one of the great colonial outposts of the New World. Even today, it’s easy to see how someone like Hemingway became enchanted with the place, and the sultriness and quality of the light to be found there is just the beginning of what is so special about Cuba…



Ever had the urge to travel back in time? A visit to Cuba is about as close as you’ll get in today’s world, it remains virtually unspoiled by the trappings of modernity you’ll find throughout the rest of the Caribbean… Much of that will change in a heartbeat, of course, once the place becomes open to Americans, and it will quickly be on the road to becoming just like anywhere else Americans currently travel en masse...







Probably just me, but I think it’s always healthy to be reminded how privileged we as Americans are, and what whiny bitches as a nation we have become… (grin) You won’t receive a warmer, more genuine and generous welcome anywhere than from the Cuban people, they fully appreciate the risk an American takes traveling there, and are deeply appreciative of that fact, and the effort we've made to travel there… Despite the grimness of their lives, they are just a wonderful people, very well informed politically, eager to discuss their future prospects with Americans… I found it extremely rare to be treated as just another tourist “mark” in Cuba, as has become so commonplace in the rest of the Caribbean…






Then there’s the colors, and the artwork… Very unique and distinctive, one of my most treasured paintings is from the artists flea market in Havana…



Of course, if you like cars, the whole damn place is a living museum… You'll be blown away by the ingenuity these people display, keeping their fleet running with the limited resources at their disposal...





Finally, there’s the cruising itself… Fairly challenging, and if you want to get away from the hordes of kroozers infesting most of the rest of the Caribbean, this is the place. You’ll likely be on your own in many places, I never saw another boat in the 5 days I spent in Baracoa, for example…



Make no mistake, cruising in Cuba can still be a frustrating experience in many respects, dealing with the bureaucracy gets VERY old, VERY quickly… But still, one of the most fascinating, rewarding, and educational cruising experiences I’ve ever had, I’m really glad I took the chance to go there when I did…
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