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Old 02-03-2011
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The problem probably isn't the fact that you've got full battens, but more likely that the battens are causing pressure against the sail track and the resulting friction is what makes raising/lowering the sail difficult. I have the same issue with my sail.

If you were to upgrade to a batt car or Tides Strong Track system when you get your new main sail, I'd bet that you'd find even a full battened mainsail would be easier to raise and lower than what you've got now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabreman View Post
We've been discussion mainsail feet in a separate thread. Now for the battens.

As many of you know, I'm buying a mainsail. I'd like for it to be a cruising triadial, but cost will force it to be a cross cut. We predominately cruise with an occasional race. Longevity is key closely followed by performance. Primary location is the Chesapeake and perhaps coastal offshore (Annapolis- Newport) if I can get enough time to get that far south, blah, blah.

The sail will be loose footed for all the reasons listed in the other thread. The next question is the number of battens and the roach. I'd like as full a roach as possible to maximize sail area, but am in a bit of a quandary regarding # of battens. I'm leaning toward 2 full upper and 2 partial lower battens. The North dealer suggests 4 full battens for longevity. I already have 4 full battens on my old retrofitted main and it's difficult to hoist at times (it's 60lbs).

Opinions?
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