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Old 02-04-2011
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The big part of the learning is to apply the paint evenly to the required thickness. To test this you need a WET MIL gauge. it looks like a credit card with little notches of varying depths that correspond to the the thickness of the wet paint you just rolled on. Simply dip the edge of the mil gauge into the wet paint, and check the corresponding paint thickness. Every paint will tell you how many mils wet, or dry the paint should be applied. If the paint is to be applied at 3 mils dry, and has 50 % solids, you need to apply it 6 mils wet. The next thing in improving your paint, will be to get a #2 Zahn cup, and a stopwatch. Dip the Zahn cup into the paint, and as it drains out the hole in the bottom, look for the first break in the stream and that is the time you record. Simply thin your paint to achieve the correct time. As it gets warmer in the day you will need to thin less. If you were to paint alot, it would be nice to record the temperature of the paint as well. Most paint stores will give you a mil gauge for free, but a Zahn cup will set ya back a hundred bucks or so. But once you use it , you will never go back. Keep everything CLEAN!
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