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Old 08-29-2011
olson34 olson34 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grand River Raider View Post
I'm interested in the names of those half dozen. Would they include Pearson and Ericson? Cape Dory? (Yes, I know that is only 3 )

And this was what I was trying to get at in my OP about build quality. The reputation seems to be that some of the builders, even if no longer in business, produced a superior product to some of the current manufacturers. I'm still trying to grasp exactly what superior build quality refers to and perhaps I'll have to fall back to the car analogy that is sometimes used to rank boats...however incomplete that may be.

GRR
Superior Build Quality is sort of like checking out the footings and foundation of your proposed house purchase before getting seduced by the new kitchen appliances.

On a boat, check out the hull-to-deck joint. Ports framed in plastic or ss/aluminum. (Bronze on classic designs like the Cape Dory)
If the hull is cored, you need to have a good survey to see if water intrusion has compromised the designed-in strength.

While a "stick built" interior like inside the the Sabre's and Ericson's is wonderful, an interior incorporating more frp modules can be just s strong and durable. Look for complete tabbing of all the interior pieces to the hull. Be a bit wary of "floating" bulkheads, and ancient generalized claims that the builder used "special adhesive" to hold structural stuff together.

FWIW, That system of glassing the inside of the hull and deck together to form a one-piece structure did indeed cost Ericson Yachts extra labor and materials. All the higher-end builders did this or something similar. I still have a nice drawing of the structure of the Yamaha 33 and 36 joint, and there was a lot of effort and engineering that went into it.

Talk to a good surveyor about what to look for. If you can find a copy of Jim Jessie's great video, "How to be your own surveyor, almost", grab it.

All that, and winnow out a lot of "wisdom" you find from opinionated strangers, like even me, on the 'net!


LB
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