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Old 10-29-2006
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Melrna-

Are you aware that most bluewater boats have smaller cockpits as a safety feature. A large cockpit, that gets pooped, can hold enough water to endanger the safety of the boat in many cases. Coastal cruisers, which are generally not out in as heavy weather, since they can turn into harbors relatively quickly, have larger cockpits for the larger crews that are often on them for daysails.

Also, 150 gallons of water is 1200 pounds of weight and takes up about 20 cubic feet. 100 gallons of fuel is about 700 lbs. Most of the boats that can carry this amount of water and fuel in built-in tanks are going to be towards the higher end of your size range.

Are you sure that both you or your partner will be capable of handling a boat this size alone in an emergency?? Just something to consider. A Hallberg Rassy 40, which is in the size range and about the same tankage as you're looking at, has almost 870 sq. ft. of sail area between the mainsail and the 100% jib. If the boat has a problem and the electric winches die...would you be able to reef the main sail manually??

Just a few points for you to consider. Also, as the boat size goes up, so does the amount of maintenance, the cost of repairs, hauling out, docking, mooring, etc. Do you want a floating condo or a sailboat? Some others on this site, who have boats in that size range, never seem to sail them... just use them as floating or drydocked condos... which seems to be an awful waste of money to me.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Last edited by sailingdog; 10-29-2006 at 11:05 AM.
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