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Old 08-12-2012
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The problem with anchoring is that It's like local knowledge; what works great in one area is sufficiently problematic elsewhere. For example; in the PNW where every backwater was used for either dumping logs, towing logs, booming logs or creating landings for logging, the bottom is covered with cables, chains, deadheads and stumps. Most welded anchors will get eaten up and swallowed. Cast anchors like the CQR on the other hand seem trouble free. On the East coast with its sand and muddy bottoms from sluggish moving waters and rivers, welded anchors especially the Danforth seems to rule as almost everyone has one and they work as designed; easy to set and easy to retrieve. For those that say they have one of everything, well hallelujah. I'm not sure where they stow them but cudos for being prepared. Weight really isn't an issue, if a boats reserve flotation isn't sufficient to carry the weight of an anchor you've more problems than being grounded. Even a 20' 2000lb boat can lift a 200lb anchor. It's about the set and scope not weight. The set is subject to variations but not the scope. Even a 10:1 scope could be an issue. If your sitting in 30' of water when you drop anchor, and there's a 10' tide; you're now siting in 40' of water and 300' of rode you had giving you a scope of 7.5:1. Now that's okay, but if the weather is snotty with a little swell and a blow, it could easily drag. In areas of higher tides this is even more of an issue; that's why it's called an anchor watch. Weight of the rode which affect the angle and bite of the set seems to be the only common factor related to ground type. While I prefer all chain for the most part, I do have another setup next to my all chain that's made of 100' feet of chain and 300' of nylon rode that I'll sometimes use to double up. Others don't like all chain, sobeit as long as they not drifting over my anchor line or into me, I really could care less. Unfortunately, anchoring isn't even like which underwear to put on in the morning as there's more variations of anchoring than there are of Tommy Hilfigers.
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