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Old 10-03-2012
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Re: 35 year old standing rigging - but rigger says it's ok

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
My information on the x rays every 7 years was given by a guy that works with Sparcraft (one of the biggest world manufactures) so even if I cannot find it on the net I have no reason to doubt that it is their standard. But here you can look at the one of a smaller company Southern Spars and that's about the same:

Full service - at five yearly intervals

-...

- Proof test comparison against initial test figures of select rigging pieces.

- Non-destructive testing (dye penetrant or x-ray) of hangers, ball-head screws and turnbuckles.



Southern Spars: Servicing rigs

and Rig Pro recommends the same each 4 years:

"4 Year Service

..The associated fittings are thoroughly cleaned and recommended for non-destructive testing (NDT) to ensure there are no additional faults or weaknesses. "


RSB Rigging Solutions - Rig Pro - Spars

This guy says the same:

"My personal recommendation is to have your rod or wire rigging (main and genoa roller furling gear also) fully disassembled, cleaned, serviced, lubricated and dye-penetrant test swages and/or rod heads once every 5 years, MINIMUM."

The Crowley Advisor: April 2012

So I think it is safe to say that the Industry Standard is 5 to 7 years for a NDT testing, I mean not a simple visual one (x-rays or dye penetrant). Here x rays is more common.

Regards

Paulo
I think European standards are higher than US standards for boats (including rigging). I understand in Europe your boat needs a complete inspection (structural, electrical, hull, rig) in order to get the boat registered- correct me if this is wrong.

This from Southern Spar:


"Full service - at five yearly intervals

- Visual inspection of all cables and fittings for wear, chafe and corrosion.

- Check pre-tension loads.

- Disassemble rigging components for full clean, inspection and re-lubrication.

- Proof test comparison against initial test figures of select rigging pieces.

- Non-destructive testing (dye penetrant or x-ray) of hangers, ball-head screws and turnbuckles.

- If necessary, replacement of hangers, ball-head screws, turnbuckles and other components."

So what all this seems to indicate, if you do a complete rig inspection (including x-ray or dye) and all looks ok, then you rig is good to go and this is independent of age or miles under the keel. I would hope this is the way it is, and your rigging parts do not just fail for no reason. So if there have been failures (as others have mentioned and we know there are) of rigging gear, the reason is either the part was low quality or had a defect, the part was not inspected, or the inspection was not adequate.
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